FULL LIST OF TRAINING & CAPACITY

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a Time of Automation

McKinsey & Company

Automation is not a new phenomenon, and fears about its transformation of the workplace and effects on employment date back centuries, even before the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the 1960s, US President Lyndon Johnson empaneled a “National Commission on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress.” Among its conclusions was “the basic fact that technology destroys jobs, but not work.”* Fast forward and rapid recent advances in automation technologies, including artificial intelligence, autonomous systems, and robotics are now raising the fears anew—and with new urgency. In our January 2017 report on automation, A future that works: Automation, employment, and productivity, we analyzed the automation potential of the global economy, the timelines over which the phenomenon could play out, and the powerful productivity boost that automation adoption could deliver.

Resource Type: 
Report

Interventions to Improve the Labour Market Outcomes of Youth: A Systematic Review of Training, Entrepreneurship Promotion, Employment Services and Subsidized Employment Interventions

Campbell Collaboration

This Campbell systematic review examines the impact of youth employment interventions on the labour market outcomes of young people and business performance. The review summarises findings from 113 reports of 107 interventions in 31 countries.

 

The Demand-Driven Training Toolkit: A Resource for Aligning Youth Employment Programs with Labor Market Demand

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International
DATE: 
Dec 12, 2017 (09:30am)

With support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Making Cents International developed the Demand-Driven Training for Youth Employment Toolkit, a resource designed to assist education-to-employment providers interested in maximizing program outcomes such as placement and retention rates, satisfaction of em

Private Sector Partnership and Out-of-School Youth Development: The MYDev Experience

EDC and USAID

Emerging economies within fragile environments hinge upon youth having the right kinds of technical and work readiness skills to secure meaningful, well-paid work and in turn contribute to family livelihoods. Throughout the world, EDC’s youth programs have helped young people succeed in jobs, entrepreneurship, and on-going career learning through programs that connect young people with skills training and employers.

Scaling Demand-Driven Training Programs: A Framework

Making Cents International

“Building Inclusive Economies, where more people have access to more opportunities, equal shots at success, and the freedom to dene what success looks like for themselves” is a pillar of the Rockefeller Foundation's work. By 2050, 400 million young people in Africa will need sustainable employment opportunities, while national labor markets are struggling to keep up with this youth bulge.

4 Insights for Better Youth Training in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa

Devex

Agriculture is the primary source of income for many rural populations in Africa, but keeping youth involved in the sector is a major challenge. Training opportunities are often limited, and income is inconsistent across the seasonality of many crops. As a result, many rural youth engage in a plethora of economic activities to support themselves, ranging from formal agricultural production to informal cash-paid labor. A recent year-long study by The MasterCard Foundation has shone some light on the diverse economic lives of rural youth in Ghana and Uganda.

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