FULL LIST OF EDUCATION

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Youth Labor Skill Training in Nepal

World Bank Group

Training is one of the main ways that the Nepal government intervenes in the labor market. This descriptive study documents patterns, trends, correlates, and the labor-market effects of formal off-the-job training of youth, based on national household survey data. Training rates in Nepal tend to be higher than in other South Asian countries. Within the country, rates are higher for traditionally advantaged groups. While both short-and long-term training programs are available, most programs are short-term.

Resource Type: 
Paper

Western Balkans Labor Market Trends 2018

World Bank Group, Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies

Executive Summary

Resource Type: 
Report

Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Global Synthesis Report

International Center of Research on Women (ICRW) and the World Bank

Abstract:

Resource Type: 
Report

E-Resource: Learn How To Become

Learn How To Become

Learn How To Become packs a huge amount of research in a single page on many career and educational topics.

There are job advice pages like their get-hired toolkit, and many guides that explain the educational paths to get the credentials or experience needed to succeed in various fields.

This resource is useful for youth looking to explore the trajectory of a particular career. Their get-hired toolkit includes guides to job search sites, interviewing skills, resume advice, and internship guidance, among others. 

Resource Type: 
E-Resource

High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) Second Follow-Up

U.S. Department of Education, National Center For Education Statistics

This report presents selected findings from the second follow-up of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). HSLS:09 follows a nationally representative sample of students who were ninth-graders in fall 2009 from the beginning of high school into higher education and the workforce.

Resource Type: 
Report

Global Education and Skills Forum

ORGANIZER: 
Varkey Foundation
DATE: 
Mar 17, 2018 (All day) to Mar 18, 2018 (All day)
Each year the Global Education & Skills Forum brings together world leaders from the public, private and social sectors seeking solutions to achieving education, equity and employment for all. Over two days, more than 2,000 delegates at the Global Education & Skills Forum share, debate and shape new ways for education to transform our world. The Forum culminates in the awarding of the Global Teacher Prize - recognition that every child deserves an exceptional teacher. 

Are Colleges Preparing Students for the Automated Future of Work?

The Washington Post
President Trump’s rhetoric about the decline of the working class blames trade, immigration and the outsourcing of American jobs overseas for the decline of the U.S. manufacturing sector. But the bigger culprit is rarely acknowledged by politicians or the media: automation. Nearly 9 in 10 jobs that have disappeared since 2000 were lost to automation, according to a study by Ball State University. As Barack Obama said in his presidential farewell speech in Chicago earlier this year, the next wave of economic dislocations “will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes a lot of good, middle-class jobs obsolete.”

President Trump’s rhetoric about the decline of the working class blames trade, immigration and the outsourcing of American jobs overseas for the decline of the U.S. manufacturing sector.
 
But the bigger culprit is rarely acknowledged by politicians or the media: automation. Nearly 9 in 10 jobs that have disappeared since 2000 were lost to automation, according to a study by Ball State University. As Barack Obama said in his presidential farewell speech in Chicago earlier this year, the next wave of economic dislocations “will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes a lot of good, middle-class jobs obsolete.”

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