FULL LIST OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

CONFERENCE: The Corps Network National Conference, February 12-15, 2017

ORGANIZER: 
The Corps Network
DATE: 
Feb 12, 2017 (All day) to Feb 15, 2017 (All day)

The Corps Network National Conference is an annual gathering of national, state, and local leaders in the fields of youth development, community service, and the environment. Attendees include approximately 200 Directors and senior staff from Service and Conservation Corps across the country; officials from federal agencies; representatives from philanthropic foundations; and friends and supporters of the Corps movement.

BLOG: 10 Lessons in 10 Years: Building the Youth Economic Opportunities Sector, Oct 2016

Making Cents International

A decade ago, I organized the first-ever global convening with the singular focus on how to increase the scale and sustainability of the youth economic opportunities sector. Fast forward ten years, to this past September, when 543 people from 53 countries gathered to share their knowledge, and celebrate the 10th anniversary of this event: The Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit. Clearly, we were on to something big. 

REPORT: Rural Development Report 2016 Rural Development Report 2016-Fostering Inclusive Rural Transformation, September 2016

International Fund for Agricultural Development

Recent progress against poverty has been steady across the globe (fi gure A). But in most regions, poverty rates in rural areas still stand well above those in urban areas. These trends refl ect the continuing challenges facing rural areas linked to the social, economic and political marginalization of rural people. Small family farms dominate rural landscapes across the developing world, accounting for up to 80 per cent of food produced in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, while supporting livelihoods of up to 2.5 billion people (IFAD 2015). Yet these farmers face long-standing barriers to accessing technology, finance, knowledge and markets. At the same time, pressures on the rural natural resource base are growing, linked to population growth, unsustainable agricultural practices, urbanization, mining, land-use conversion and deforestation. 

Resource Type: 
Report

BLOG: Youth’s Passion and Ingenuity Bring Inspiration and Hope for the Future, May 2016

The World Bank

The five winners of the 2016 Blog4Dev highlighted inequality as one of the key issues impacting young people in Africa. Young people who have access to opportunities can afford better education but interestingly face strong pressure on who they should become - a doctor, an engineer -- professions that make their parents happy.  The less fortunate have to move from rural areas and cities in search for stability. They sometimes face harsh conditions, often working on low quality jobs, saving to send money to their families back home.  

BLOG: Do Young People Hold the Key to Ending Poverty? April 2016

Mail & Guardian, World Economic Forum

Africa is the richest continent in natural resources in the world. It also has the youngest population, with more than 65% of its people younger than 30 and 200-million of them aged between 15 and 24. By 2045, this figure is forecast to double and Africa will have the largest workforce in the world, surpassing both China and India. Yet it is this burgeoning, youthful population that is crippled by poverty. While Africa’s young people constitute about 40% of the continent’s working-age population, they make up 60% of the total unemployed population.

BLOG: Farming in Sneakers: Changing Youth Views on Ag for Empowered, and Exciting, Employment, March 2016

SNV USA

“Youth are the strength of a nation.” Says Monalisa Mbise, participant in SNV’s Opportunities for Youth Employment (OYE) program in Tanzania. When observing the power and potential of youth, it’s hard to face that worldwide 74 million young people are unemployed. In the countries where OYE operates, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Mozambique, unemployment rates for youth are 2 to 3 times higher than those for adults, with an even higher rate of unemployment among young women.

BLOG: Youth and Agriculture Programs: Oil and Water or Oil and Vinegar? February 2016

Making Cents International

Oil and water?  Seemingly, that’s how youth and agriculture programs have evolved—as separate entities that resist being mixed together. The resistance comes from both sides. Traditional agricultural programs often focus on adults, throwing in youth targets only if required. And traditional youth programs often shy away from agricultural livelihoods, which are seen as holding no appeal for young people. Instead of oil and water, Making Cents likens youth and agriculture programs to oil and vinegar. These mix remarkably well in the right combination, creating a new and unique product and nourishing results.

BLOG: Youth Unemployment: Striking in Richer Countries, March 2016

The New York Times

AT no point in recorded history has our world been so demographically lopsided, with old people concentrated in rich countries and the young in not-so-rich countries. Much has been made of the challenges of aging societies. But it’s the youth bulge that stands to put greater pressure on the global economy, sow political unrest, spur mass migration and have profound consequences for everything from marriage to Internet access to the growth of cities.

BLOG: Young Women and Work: International Women's Day, March 2016

The World Bank

Development happens through jobs. They allow families to escape poverty, individuals to develop skills, and excluded groups such as women and youth to gain economic independence. This blog presents solutions that will lead to more, better and inclusive jobs brings by presenting ideas and perspectives from global thought leaders on the jobs challenge. The most recent World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Report found that while over the past 10 years 250 million more women have entered the labor force, women’s average annual earnings today remain a decade behind men’s. 

Why the UN is Prioritizing Youth in 2016

The WorldPost

Youth are too often overlooked as stakeholders in conversations about global governance. When the conversation is about sustainability, no demographic should be more front and center than the youth (individuals aged 15-24) who will inherit the world we shape now. Currently, youth stats are unsustainable. In response to this youth unemployment crisis, and in an effort to engage youth in governing for the future, the United Nations Economic and Social Council hosted a Youth Forum this month.

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