FULL LIST OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Workforce development initiatives build the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that youth need to obtain and participate in productive work. Activities in this area strive to bring the private and public sector together to ensure that education improves both the workforce readiness and technical skills necessary for youth to participate in the world of work effectively.

Where are we now?

Workforce development as a field is hard to generalize due to its many different providers, approaches, and target populations, which range from universities educating highly-skilled medical personnel to community organizations providing basic literacy skills to out-of-school youth.  However, increasing global unemployment and events, such as the Arab Spring, have highlighted a common problem of these providers - their services have not kept pace with changes in the private sector, leading to widespread mismatches between skills available and those demanded. Practitioners are responding through a renewed emphasis on collaboration with the private sector to ensure that educational institutions and community organizations are providing demand-driven skills to students, while employers invest in improved on-the-job training to build the skills of new employees quickly and cost-effectively.

Trends and Best Practices

  • Private sector buy-in is critical in developing the programs that link young people to formal employment opportunities. When the private sector is an invested party with donors and social organizations, there is greater possibility for young people to access employment opportunities as they continuously develop their skills and knowledge.
  • Young people and their families are looking for programs that offer practical and hands on opportunities, such as apprenticeships with trade based companies or internships with companies or NGO's. Some programs offer voucher systems that cover the cost of the internships, which have been particularly successful for young women seeking employment in more conservative countries. Participation in workforce development programs often increases when these practical opportunities for relevant skills application are included.
  • Many vocational institutions are not best placed to develop the technical skills of young people given the high rate of change in technology and the challenges for these institutions to keep pace. The private sector, on the other hand, has to keep pace with the market to remain competitive and therefore offers an alternative housing of skills development offerings.
  • Historically, workforce development focused primarily on building technical skills required for a given trade. However, most programs now recognize the importance of incorporating work-readiness skills, including basic literacy, numeracy, and job conduct. If these skills are lacking, it will make their ability to function in the workplace and learn more specialized vocational skills very weak.
  • Creating employment opportunities is just as important as skills building and should encompass all types of employment – formal, informal, and self-employment. The latter two are particularly important for vulnerable populations, such as women and youth, who may be excluded from formal employment.

What We Know About Rural Youth’s Entry Into Employment

Microlinks
With the launch of the U.S. Government’s Global Food Security Strategy (GFSS) last year, the role of employment and livelihoods has come to the forefront. Given the high presence of youth in the labor force in many GFSS countries, the role of agriculture compared with other sectors in youth employment is receiving increasing attention in programs. USAID’s Chief Economist, in partnership with the Bureau for Food Security (BFS), convened a workshop this past October bringing researchers, USAID staff, and implementers together for an evidence-based exchange on the barriers to youth’s entry into work in rural and peri-urban areas. 
 

Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a Time of Automation

McKinsey & Company

Automation is not a new phenomenon, and fears about its transformation of the workplace and effects on employment date back centuries, even before the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the 1960s, US President Lyndon Johnson empaneled a “National Commission on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress.” Among its conclusions was “the basic fact that technology destroys jobs, but not work.”* Fast forward and rapid recent advances in automation technologies, including artificial intelligence, autonomous systems, and robotics are now raising the fears anew—and with new urgency. In our January 2017 report on automation, A future that works: Automation, employment, and productivity, we analyzed the automation potential of the global economy, the timelines over which the phenomenon could play out, and the powerful productivity boost that automation adoption could deliver.

Resource Type: 
Report

Are Colleges Preparing Students for the Automated Future of Work?

The Washington Post
President Trump’s rhetoric about the decline of the working class blames trade, immigration and the outsourcing of American jobs overseas for the decline of the U.S. manufacturing sector. But the bigger culprit is rarely acknowledged by politicians or the media: automation. Nearly 9 in 10 jobs that have disappeared since 2000 were lost to automation, according to a study by Ball State University. As Barack Obama said in his presidential farewell speech in Chicago earlier this year, the next wave of economic dislocations “will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes a lot of good, middle-class jobs obsolete.”

President Trump’s rhetoric about the decline of the working class blames trade, immigration and the outsourcing of American jobs overseas for the decline of the U.S. manufacturing sector.
 
But the bigger culprit is rarely acknowledged by politicians or the media: automation. Nearly 9 in 10 jobs that have disappeared since 2000 were lost to automation, according to a study by Ball State University. As Barack Obama said in his presidential farewell speech in Chicago earlier this year, the next wave of economic dislocations “will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes a lot of good, middle-class jobs obsolete.”

2018 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International
DATE: 
Sep 25, 2018 (All day) to Sep 27, 2018 (All day)

On September 25-27, 2018 the Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit will return for its 12th annual convening in Washington, D.C. Each year, over 550 youth and economic development experts from more than 50 countries gather at the Summit to advance youth social and economic inclusion. Summit attendees expand their global network, exchange knowledge, gain exposure to emerging issues and innovative new tools, and build their technical practice through interactive, hands-on learning. 

Webinar Resources | The Demand-Driven Training Toolkit: A Resource for Aligning Youth Employment Programs with Labor Market Demand

Making Cents International, The Rockefeller Foundation, Impact Sourcing Academy, EFE Egypt

With support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Making Cents International developed the Demand-Driven Training for Youth Employment Toolkit, a resource designed to assist education-to-employment providers interested in maximizing program outcomes such as placement and retention rates, satisfaction of employers and job seekers, and stakeholder return on investment. The Toolkit was developed with input from leading South African and global institutions. It is an easy-to-read, practical resource that can help institutions be more effective. This webinar introduces you to the Toolkit’s components, shares case studies of DDT programs in South Africa and Egypt, and helps you think about how to leverage the content and resources to support your own programs.

Resource Type: 
E-Resource

Interventions to Improve the Labour Market Outcomes of Youth: A Systematic Review of Training, Entrepreneurship Promotion, Employment Services and Subsidized Employment Interventions

Campbell Collaboration

This Campbell systematic review examines the impact of youth employment interventions on the labour market outcomes of young people and business performance. The review summarises findings from 113 reports of 107 interventions in 31 countries.

 

Fostering Youth-Led Farmer Services Enterprises in Uganda

Chemonics International

The Ugandan economy is largely reliant on agriculture, yet interest in farming among youth is low. Robert Anyang explores what it takes to motivate Uganda’s young people to work in the agriculture sector.

The Demand-Driven Training Toolkit: A Resource for Aligning Youth Employment Programs with Labor Market Demand

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International
DATE: 
Dec 12, 2017 (09:30am)

With support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Making Cents International developed the Demand-Driven Training for Youth Employment Toolkit, a resource designed to assist education-to-employment providers interested in maximizing program outcomes such as placement and retention rates, satisfaction of em

Global Employment Trends for Youth 2017: Paths to a Better Working Future

International Labour Organization

Incorporating the most recent employment trends for young women and men, Global Employment Trends for Youth sets out the youth labour market situation around the world.

Youth Engagement and Empowerment Holds Promise for Strengthening Community Resilience to Violent Extremism

FHI 360

Stop for a minute to think back to when you were a “youth” — say, when you were 19 years old — transitioning from adolescence into adulthood.

Did you have ideals and ideas that motivated you and peers and adult mentors who positively influenced you?
Did you have family who supported you and a community that you felt part of and in which you had a voice?
Did you have a sense of who you were and access to physical and psychological safe spaces where you could express your identity?

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