FULL LIST OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Workforce development initiatives build the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that youth need to obtain and participate in productive work. Activities in this area strive to bring the private and public sector together to ensure that education improves both the workforce readiness and technical skills necessary for youth to participate in the world of work effectively.

Where are we now?

Workforce development as a field is hard to generalize due to its many different providers, approaches, and target populations, which range from universities educating highly-skilled medical personnel to community organizations providing basic literacy skills to out-of-school youth.  However, increasing global unemployment and events, such as the Arab Spring, have highlighted a common problem of these providers - their services have not kept pace with changes in the private sector, leading to widespread mismatches between skills available and those demanded. Practitioners are responding through a renewed emphasis on collaboration with the private sector to ensure that educational institutions and community organizations are providing demand-driven skills to students, while employers invest in improved on-the-job training to build the skills of new employees quickly and cost-effectively.

Trends and Best Practices

  • Private sector buy-in is critical in developing the programs that link young people to formal employment opportunities. When the private sector is an invested party with donors and social organizations, there is greater possibility for young people to access employment opportunities as they continuously develop their skills and knowledge.
  • Young people and their families are looking for programs that offer practical and hands on opportunities, such as apprenticeships with trade based companies or internships with companies or NGO's. Some programs offer voucher systems that cover the cost of the internships, which have been particularly successful for young women seeking employment in more conservative countries. Participation in workforce development programs often increases when these practical opportunities for relevant skills application are included.
  • Many vocational institutions are not best placed to develop the technical skills of young people given the high rate of change in technology and the challenges for these institutions to keep pace. The private sector, on the other hand, has to keep pace with the market to remain competitive and therefore offers an alternative housing of skills development offerings.
  • Historically, workforce development focused primarily on building technical skills required for a given trade. However, most programs now recognize the importance of incorporating work-readiness skills, including basic literacy, numeracy, and job conduct. If these skills are lacking, it will make their ability to function in the workplace and learn more specialized vocational skills very weak.
  • Creating employment opportunities is just as important as skills building and should encompass all types of employment – formal, informal, and self-employment. The latter two are particularly important for vulnerable populations, such as women and youth, who may be excluded from formal employment.

BLOG: Investing in Youth Entrepreneurship: De-Risking a Risky Business

Chemonics

Youth entrepreneurs have called for more access to capital, but these investments are inherently risky. How can we reduce the risks associated with investing in youth entrepreneurs? Fiona Whitefield poses two solutions.

Resource Type: 
Article

E-Resource: Learn How To Become

Learn How To Become

Learn How To Become packs a huge amount of research in a single page on many career and educational topics.

There are job advice pages like their get-hired toolkit, and many guides that explain the educational paths to get the credentials or experience needed to succeed in various fields.

This resource is useful for youth looking to explore the trajectory of a particular career. Their get-hired toolkit includes guides to job search sites, interviewing skills, resume advice, and internship guidance, among others. 

Resource Type: 
E-Resource

High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) Second Follow-Up

U.S. Department of Education, National Center For Education Statistics

This report presents selected findings from the second follow-up of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). HSLS:09 follows a nationally representative sample of students who were ninth-graders in fall 2009 from the beginning of high school into higher education and the workforce.

Resource Type: 
Report

Demand Alignment Questionnaire

Making Cents International
Resource Type: 
E-Resource

Global Education and Skills Forum

ORGANIZER: 
Varkey Foundation
DATE: 
Mar 17, 2018 (All day) to Mar 18, 2018 (All day)
Each year the Global Education & Skills Forum brings together world leaders from the public, private and social sectors seeking solutions to achieving education, equity and employment for all. Over two days, more than 2,000 delegates at the Global Education & Skills Forum share, debate and shape new ways for education to transform our world. The Forum culminates in the awarding of the Global Teacher Prize - recognition that every child deserves an exceptional teacher. 

Long-Term Unemployed Youth: Characteristics and Policy Responses

Eurofound

Despite positive signs of improvement in the youth labour market across the European Union since 2014, concerns persist regarding the high levels of youth unemployment and long-term youth unemployment. While long-term youth unemployment is certainly not a new policy challenge for Europe, there is broad agreement that, having been exacerbated by the 2008 economic crisis, it now affects a wider range of young people than it ever did before, ranging from those with third-level degrees to the most disadvantaged young people. The prevalence of long-term youth unemployment also differs considerably across EU Member States and has been subject to noticeable variations across time. Although the majority of Member States have recorded an increase in long-term youth unemployment rates since the crisis, a number of countries seem to be managing this policy challenge by putting appropriate support measures in place.

Pages