FULL LIST OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Workforce development initiatives build the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that youth need to obtain and participate in productive work. Activities in this area strive to bring the private and public sector together to ensure that education improves both the workforce readiness and technical skills necessary for youth to participate in the world of work effectively.

Where are we now?

Workforce development as a field is hard to generalize due to its many different providers, approaches, and target populations, which range from universities educating highly-skilled medical personnel to community organizations providing basic literacy skills to out-of-school youth.  However, increasing global unemployment and events, such as the Arab Spring, have highlighted a common problem of these providers - their services have not kept pace with changes in the private sector, leading to widespread mismatches between skills available and those demanded. Practitioners are responding through a renewed emphasis on collaboration with the private sector to ensure that educational institutions and community organizations are providing demand-driven skills to students, while employers invest in improved on-the-job training to build the skills of new employees quickly and cost-effectively.

Trends and Best Practices

  • Private sector buy-in is critical in developing the programs that link young people to formal employment opportunities. When the private sector is an invested party with donors and social organizations, there is greater possibility for young people to access employment opportunities as they continuously develop their skills and knowledge.
  • Young people and their families are looking for programs that offer practical and hands on opportunities, such as apprenticeships with trade based companies or internships with companies or NGO's. Some programs offer voucher systems that cover the cost of the internships, which have been particularly successful for young women seeking employment in more conservative countries. Participation in workforce development programs often increases when these practical opportunities for relevant skills application are included.
  • Many vocational institutions are not best placed to develop the technical skills of young people given the high rate of change in technology and the challenges for these institutions to keep pace. The private sector, on the other hand, has to keep pace with the market to remain competitive and therefore offers an alternative housing of skills development offerings.
  • Historically, workforce development focused primarily on building technical skills required for a given trade. However, most programs now recognize the importance of incorporating work-readiness skills, including basic literacy, numeracy, and job conduct. If these skills are lacking, it will make their ability to function in the workplace and learn more specialized vocational skills very weak.
  • Creating employment opportunities is just as important as skills building and should encompass all types of employment – formal, informal, and self-employment. The latter two are particularly important for vulnerable populations, such as women and youth, who may be excluded from formal employment.

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

Making Cents International

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

BLOG: Workforce Development: A shift into high gear

RTI

This year’s Workforce Development Track of the Making Cents conference saw more than a tenfold increase in proposal submissions and will feature a record number of panelists across nine distinct workforce themed panels. The lineup of proposals and participants provides terrific insight into the range and diversity of workforce issues that the development community and countries at large are grappling with, including public private partnerships, work-based learning interventions, soft-skills measurement, technology applications, career development practices and mentorship programs.     

Can We Leapfrog to 2030? Innovations For Youth Learning, Earning and Inclusion

The Brookings Institute, Transfr VR, Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator

Access to quality education and skill building is essential in an age of rising inequality; by 2030, it is estimated that 825 million children will

Resource Type: 
Presentation

The Youth Entrepreneurship and Self-Employment Forum

ORGANIZER: 
International Labour Organization
DATE: 
Nov 13, 2018 (08:00am) to Nov 14, 2018 (06:00pm)

Join us at the YES Forum to learn more about youth entrepreneurship policies, improving access to finance for young entrepreneurs and facilitating access to markets. The two-day programme will include plenary sessions, inspirational talks, a marketplace for key actors, and a pitching competition for young entrepreneurs. The YES Forum is a featured event of the Global Entrepreneurship Week and is jointly organized by the ILO, ITC, UNCDF, UNCTAD and UNIDO under the aegis of the Global Initiative on Decent Jobs for Youth.

Youth Impact: Unleashing the Power of Youth to Deliver on Global Goals

ORGANIZER: 
International Youth Foundation
DATE: 
Oct 11, 2018 (01:00pm to 07:00pm)

On Thursday, October 11, 2018, the International Youth Foundation (IYF) and 

Powering Youth Positive Attitudes Through Visioning: A Foundation for Improved Wellbeing

Youth Alive Uganda

The Power of Vision Model is a “bridge” between current reality and desired future. The model helps create clear purpose and sense of direction in life upon which future decisions, actions and resources are based. The model helps young people to go through a process of self-discovery, draw their vision, break it down into stratified life goals, identify required resources, act on their vision and track progress using simple methodologies.

Resource Type: 
Presentation

Building Awareness, Nurturing Skills, and Closing the Confidence Gap: How to Help Young Women Join and Thrive in the Transportation Sector

Nathan Associates, Inc.; U.S. Department of Transportation; Ministry of Transport, Vietnam

Although transportation supplies 10-25% of jobs around the world, representation of women in the sector typically falls below 20%. Women are far less likely than men to work in each of the major transport modes – road/surface, rail, air, and maritime – and those with jobs tend to fill the few roles traditionally dominated by women. Young women are similarly scarce along career-paths in infrastructure design, construction, and maintenance; transportation technology; and logistics.

Resource Type: 
Presentation

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