FULL LIST OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Workforce development initiatives build the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that youth need to obtain and participate in productive work. Activities in this area strive to bring the private and public sector together to ensure that education improves both the workforce readiness and technical skills necessary for youth to participate in the world of work effectively.

Where are we now?

Workforce development as a field is hard to generalize due to its many different providers, approaches, and target populations, which range from universities educating highly-skilled medical personnel to community organizations providing basic literacy skills to out-of-school youth.  However, increasing global unemployment and events, such as the Arab Spring, have highlighted a common problem of these providers - their services have not kept pace with changes in the private sector, leading to widespread mismatches between skills available and those demanded. Practitioners are responding through a renewed emphasis on collaboration with the private sector to ensure that educational institutions and community organizations are providing demand-driven skills to students, while employers invest in improved on-the-job training to build the skills of new employees quickly and cost-effectively.

Trends and Best Practices

  • Private sector buy-in is critical in developing the programs that link young people to formal employment opportunities. When the private sector is an invested party with donors and social organizations, there is greater possibility for young people to access employment opportunities as they continuously develop their skills and knowledge.
  • Young people and their families are looking for programs that offer practical and hands on opportunities, such as apprenticeships with trade based companies or internships with companies or NGO's. Some programs offer voucher systems that cover the cost of the internships, which have been particularly successful for young women seeking employment in more conservative countries. Participation in workforce development programs often increases when these practical opportunities for relevant skills application are included.
  • Many vocational institutions are not best placed to develop the technical skills of young people given the high rate of change in technology and the challenges for these institutions to keep pace. The private sector, on the other hand, has to keep pace with the market to remain competitive and therefore offers an alternative housing of skills development offerings.
  • Historically, workforce development focused primarily on building technical skills required for a given trade. However, most programs now recognize the importance of incorporating work-readiness skills, including basic literacy, numeracy, and job conduct. If these skills are lacking, it will make their ability to function in the workplace and learn more specialized vocational skills very weak.
  • Creating employment opportunities is just as important as skills building and should encompass all types of employment – formal, informal, and self-employment. The latter two are particularly important for vulnerable populations, such as women and youth, who may be excluded from formal employment.

The Demand-Driven Training Toolkit: A Resource for Aligning Youth Employment Programs with Labor Market Demand

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International
DATE: 
Dec 12, 2017 (09:30am)

With support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Making Cents International developed the Demand-Driven Training for Youth Employment Toolkit, a resource designed to assist education-to-employment providers interested in maximizing program outcomes such as placement and retention rates, satisfaction of em

Global Employment Trends for Youth 2017: Paths to a Better Working Future

International Labour Organization

Incorporating the most recent employment trends for young women and men, Global Employment Trends for Youth sets out the youth labour market situation around the world.

Youth Engagement and Empowerment Holds Promise for Strengthening Community Resilience to Violent Extremism

FHI 360

Stop for a minute to think back to when you were a “youth” — say, when you were 19 years old — transitioning from adolescence into adulthood.

Did you have ideals and ideas that motivated you and peers and adult mentors who positively influenced you?
Did you have family who supported you and a community that you felt part of and in which you had a voice?
Did you have a sense of who you were and access to physical and psychological safe spaces where you could express your identity?

5 Things to Know About Jobs and Skills in 2017

World Economic Forum

Currently, the world has developed only 62% of its human capital as measured by the World Economic Forum’s 2017 Global Human Capital Index.

5 Ways to Advance Youth Economic Opportunities

International Youth Foundation

Throughout the world, young people contribute their ideas and energy by starting businesses, leading organizations, volunteering, and addressing some of the biggest global problems. However, far too many youth don’t have access to the opportunities they need to get by, much less reach their full potential. A new video animation highlights global statistics while underscoring the need for greater investment in youth economic opportunities.

Our Young World, created by IYF in partnership with the Mastercard Foundation—offers five key recommendations for supporting youth to thrive:

Why Matchmaking in Youth Employment Programs in Middle East North Africa Aren’t Working

Stanford Social Innovation Review

If you come from the Arab region, you will no doubt recognize the term "Khattaba”—the word used to describe the traditional matchmaker who helps a young man find a bride. The Khattaba looks for certain qualifications in the bride-to-be that have been set by the groom or his mother, and holds complete discretion in determining a potential bride’s suitability. The brides have very little say in their futures. And when the marriage struggles or fails, the Khattaba is often blamed for poor judgment.

Setting Young People on a Path to Lifelong Success

Stanford Social Innovation Review

The access and opportunities that help many of us get ahead in life are not equally available to those living in under-resourced communities. Structural racial, ethnic, gender, and economic inequities in these communities often stand in the way of the dream of business ownership, and the independence and self-reliance that can come with being entrepreneurial.

Investing in the Next Generation: A Bottom-Up Approach to Creating Better Outcomes for Children and Youth

Brookings Institute

The American dream is built on the promise of upward social mobility. In the middle of the 20th century, rates of upward mobility improved across the socioeconomic spectrum. But over the course of the past 30 years, the vast majority of our population has seen mobility rates stagnate.For too many, the American dream has stalled.

Webinar Resources | Getting Young People into Work: Is There a Role for the Private Sector in Bridging the Skills Gap?

European Bank for Reconstruction & Development (EBRD)

Nine out of ten jobs are created by the private sector worldwide, making it a major force for economic growth and prosperity. However, formal education systems are often unable to meet the market’s specific demands for talent and skills. This creates problems on two fronts – young people lack the skills to successfully compete for jobs while firms are unable to fill their open positions. The EBRD’s unique economic inclusion approach supports clients across a wide range of sectors to address this skills mismatch and thereby enhance equitable access to jobs and training. This webinar will discuss the role of the private sector in opening up economic opportunities for young people specifically, and how actors in the YEO space can engage with the private sector to enhance youth inclusion.

Getting Young People into Work: Is There a Role for the Private Sector in Bridging the Skills Gap?

ORGANIZER: 
European Bank for Reconstruction & Development and Making Cents International
DATE: 
Nov 7, 2017 (11:00am)
The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), an international financial institution active in nearly 40 countries across Europe, Central Asia and the Mediterranean, believes that opening up of economic opportunities to under-served social groups is integral to achieving a transition towards sustainable market economies. 
 

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