FULL LIST OF TECHNOLOGY

BLOG: Building the Digital Skills of the Largest Future Workforce, May 2016

Devex

Despite the rapid growth of digital skills building programs, the demand for programming skills from employers and students still outpaces supply. While students need more than basic coding familiarity to launch billion dollar companies, courses such as these have the potential not only to equip young people with the skills they need to succeed, but also to promote entrepreneurial opportunity and economic growth across the continent. What more is needed to build digital skills on the continent that will be home to the largest workforce in the world by 2050?

FORUM: Global Youth Forum 2016, June 13-15, 2016

ORGANIZER: 
The World Bank Group (WBG) and Global Partnership for Youth in Development
DATE: 
Jun 13, 2016 (All day) to Jun 15, 2016 (All day)

The Global Youth Forum 2016 will gather more than 150 partners and representatives from the public and private sectors, civil society, and young people themselves, to exchange new and innovative ideas, and to support the actions of the global community. The forum is designed around open discussions, based on evidence and experience, of the most effective ways to address both opportunities and  challenges facing young people and to engage young people in development.

BLOG: Youth’s Passion and Ingenuity Bring Inspiration and Hope for the Future, May 2016

The World Bank

The five winners of the 2016 Blog4Dev highlighted inequality as one of the key issues impacting young people in Africa. Young people who have access to opportunities can afford better education but interestingly face strong pressure on who they should become - a doctor, an engineer -- professions that make their parents happy.  The less fortunate have to move from rural areas and cities in search for stability. They sometimes face harsh conditions, often working on low quality jobs, saving to send money to their families back home.  

HANDBOOK: National Youth Delegate Programme to the United Nations, May 2016

United Nations

Active youth participation at the United Nations is a critical contribution to successful international cooperation. The purpose of this handbook is to provide interested young people around the world with the information they need to approach their governments with the request to include youth voices in their national delegations to the United Nations. Being a part of the UNA movement provides opportunities for engagement with United Nations issues in your home countries and internationally. If you do not have a UNA in your country, we hope you will reach out to us and explore the possibility of establishing one

Resource Type: 
E-Resource

EVENT: How Can Women and Girls Use Technology to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals? May 19, 2016

ORGANIZER: 
Technology Salon
DATE: 
May 19, 2016 (All day)

The Women Deliver Conference happening next week in Copenhagen is world’s largest global conference on the health, rights, and wellbeing of girls and women in the last decade. There are four days of events, many of which we can watch via the livestream or follow online. Please RSVP now to join the WD2016 discussion through a special in-person event here in Washington, DC, focusing on a topic that seems to be largely missing from the conference agenda: How women and girls can use the tools of technology to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

BLOG: A Phone of Her Own: How Mobile Access Can Change Women’s Lives, March 2016

World Bank

Mobile phone ownership gives women the ability to open a mobile phone-based bank account, an important gateway to financial independence. A private account gives women in developing nations control over their money as well as the ability to put food on the family table.  A mobile phone also gives women the ability to open a business in a remote village, without having to trek to a distant city to register that business. And, with a phone, women in developing countries can more easily schedule a clinic appointment or register their children for school.

BLOG: How Coding Bootcamps are Helping to Tackle Youth Unemployment, April 2016

The World Bank

The emergence of bootcamps in developing countries signals determination of local people and businesses to participate in the digital revolution, but does not guarantee immediate results. The potential impact on employability can be substantial, but needs further testing. Recognizing the need to better understand the impact of bootcamps on employability, the World Bank ICT Innovation Team  launched a Rapid Technology Skills Training Program focused on programming skills, which are among the most demanded (and the most deficient) by employers.

BLOG: Obama Hails Young Inquiring Minds at His Final White House Science Fair, April 2016

The New York Times

Six White House Science Fairs later, Obama hailed an amazing new collection of young minds yesterday. It’s been heartening to see how this administration, despite funding blockades by Republican lawmakers,  has never flagged in its push for better science education as a path to renewing a culture of innovation. (Substantial credit is almost assuredly due John P. Holdren, the president’s science adviser.)

BLOG: Is Technology Really Helping Youth to Progress, April 2016

The Commonwealth Youth Programme

Technology is progressively ingrained into our lives, slowly but surely replacing tasks that we once used to do on pen and paper. In education, technology is more and more becoming part and parcel of development and is a necessary requirement in the learning process. This huge reliance on technology, however, does not mean everyone is granted the same access to technology. Technology is part and parcel of everyday life, writes Juliana Chia, 24, a Correspondent from Singapore, who challenges youth to raise questions about inequality of access that puts some students at a disadvantage.

BLOG: Technology, Sound Record Keeping and Access to Finance Could be the Keys to Youth Unemployment in Kenya, March 2016

The World Bank

Youth in Kenya are experiencing much higher unemployment rates than the rest of the Kenyan population. In 2014, Munga and Onsomu, reported that youths aged 15-19 and 20-24 years had unemployment rates of 25% and 24%, respectively about double the overall unemployment of 12.7% for the entire working-age group. Despite this, the Kenya youth are slowly transitioning from the risk averse mentality; that is, one has to be employed and depend on a monthly income in order to earn a living.

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