FULL LIST OF FINANCIAL INCLUSION

Globally, Young people access financial services at roughly half the rate of adults.  According to the World Bank’s Global Findex database, youth are 40% less likely to save at banks and 60% less likely to have borrowed.[1]  Without these services, young people have fewer means to manage their assets, invest in education, or grow businesses.  In response, youth inclusive financial services programs are working with regulators, financial services providers, and informal savings group promoters to increase young people’s access to appropriate savings, credit, payment, and insurance products.  At the same time, recognizing that youth often lack the knowledge or experience to use services effectively, programs are offering financial education and life-skills training and information to boost financial capability. 

Over the past three years there has been a growing awareness of the importance and viability of finance for youth among service providers.  However, overall access has not changed significantly, with the proportion of youth savings and borrowing formally barely changing.  In response, youth-inclusive practitioners are looking more closely at the potential of new technologies to boost access and capability - at digital payments and mobile wallets to lower the costs of providing services, “big data” to help banks understand the youth market and reduce the risk of lending, and smart phones to offer new convenient and inexpensive means to teach financial education to youth.  At the same time, there is renewed interest in old technologies such as savings groups to expand access to youth.  Through these new and old technologies, practitioners are working to boost financial inclusion significantly among youth.

 

Financial Education + Life Skills = Girl Power

Aflatoun

It’s 8 March 2017, International Women’s Day. As my colleague David beautifully said: “It’s a day to remember that women are not treated equally to men across the world. It’s a reminder that women worldwide are exposed to shocking abuse from sexual violence and female genital mutilation, to forced early marriage and deprivation of their most basic rights.

Financial Education's Contribution to Girls' Economic Empowerment: A Global Review

Aflatoun
Globally, there are 600 million adolescent girls in developing countries who face challenges to education and health services and too often face persistent discrimination and violence. They frequently have limited opportunities to gain the education, knowledge, resources, and skills that can lead to economic advancement.
 

Finding a Formula for Youth Economic Empowerment

Plan International
Plan International’s Banking on Change program shows how providing girls and young women with savings skills doesn't just produce financial rewards.
 
“We were just using the money anywhere,” says Cleopatra, a 20 year-old young woman from the Central Province of Zambia, describing the challenge she once faced managing her family’s finances.
 

Financial Inclusion for Children and Youth

Child & Youth Finance International (CYFI)
This paper is part of the Child and Youth Finance International Landscape Series. Each paper in the Landscape Series looks back on the developments of recent years and looks forward to the future. This paper focuses on financial inclusion for children and youth. 

Global Inclusion Awards 2017

ORGANIZER: 
Child & Youth Finance International (CYFI)
DATE: 
May 3, 2017 (All day)

The Global Inclusion Awards 2017, a CYFI initiative, recognise and honour those that achieve greatness and demonstrate innovation in financial, social and livelihoods education, financial inclusion, and entrepreneurial support for children and youth at the national, regional and international level.

Financial Literacy Conference

ORGANIZER: 
National Institue of Education Singapore
DATE: 
Mar 9, 2017 (All day) to Mar 11, 2017 (All day)
The Financial Literacy Conference 2017 will be held from 9 to 11 March 2017 in Singapore with the theme “Expanding Possibilities”.
A highlight of the conference will be the sharing by educators, researchers, and practitioners on current findings and innovations in the teaching of financial education to children and youth. The conference now opens a call for submissions.
 
Learn more and register here

Webinar Recording: Rural Youth Finance - A Bridge too Far?

Making Cents International and RTI International

Rural youth tend to be the least financially included: youth financial inexperience and limited assets exacerbate the basic rural finance challenges of low population density and poor infrastructure.  Nonetheless, they demand financial services to manage their resources, build assets, and invest in livelihoods or education. How should the financial sector react to this situation – try to serve rural youth directly with new products and services, focus on the “near adults” in a rural finance strategy and deepen services over time, or ignore this population until the challenges of rural finance can be overcome? 136 financial inclusion practitioners came together on January 11th to discuss these issues and determine whether rural youth financial inclusion was possible, or simply a bridge too far.

Resource Type: 
E-Resource

WEBINAR: Rural Youth Financial Inclusion – A Bridge too Far? Jan 11, 2017

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International and RTI International
DATE: 
Jan 11, 2017 (09:00am to 10:00am)

Making Cents and RTI International are pleased to announce an in-person and webinar event on January 11, 2017 that will bring together financial inclusion and youth experts to discuss the key issues related to scaling rural and youth-inclusive financial services.  The panel will highlight digital and practical innovations that have the potential to financially include rural populations and especially youth, but also the challenges of applying them to this hard-to-reach group. Panelists will draw from discussions at the recent USAID-sponsored Financial Inclusion Forum, results from a 6-part rural youth learning series developed by Making Cents and IFAD, promising practices from USAID’s K-YES project in Kenya, and other initiatives focusing on rural youth financial service provision.  

BLOG: Does the Path to Serving Rural Youth Lead to Adults First? Dec 2016

Making Cents International

The challenge of youth unemployment continues to garner headlines. Recently, the New York Times described the demographic challenge as, “The World Has a Problem: Too Many Young People.”[1] These headlines have galvanized interest in youth and led governments and donors to re-focus their efforts on employing this growing population. Youth-inclusive financial efforts have expanded as well, aimed at providing youth with the credit and savings services necessary to facilitate their “earning and learning.”

BLOG: Access To Finance For Youth: An Opportunity In Afghanistan, Oct 2016

Chemonics International

Financial inclusion seeks to increase the number of individuals who are able to access formal financial services, with a focus on providing access to marginalized populations such as youth or women. According to the World Bank, almost 40 percent of the adults in the world do not use formal financial services, such as licensed commercial and development banks, savings and loan companies, and deposit-taking entities. The majority of the individuals who do not access these services come from poor households. 

Pages