FULL LIST OF GLOBAL

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Making Cents International
Resource Type: 
E-Resource

Global Education and Skills Forum

ORGANIZER: 
Varkey Foundation
DATE: 
Mar 17, 2018 (All day) to Mar 18, 2018 (All day)
Each year the Global Education & Skills Forum brings together world leaders from the public, private and social sectors seeking solutions to achieving education, equity and employment for all. Over two days, more than 2,000 delegates at the Global Education & Skills Forum share, debate and shape new ways for education to transform our world. The Forum culminates in the awarding of the Global Teacher Prize - recognition that every child deserves an exceptional teacher. 

Long-Term Unemployed Youth: Characteristics and Policy Responses

Eurofound

Despite positive signs of improvement in the youth labour market across the European Union since 2014, concerns persist regarding the high levels of youth unemployment and long-term youth unemployment. While long-term youth unemployment is certainly not a new policy challenge for Europe, there is broad agreement that, having been exacerbated by the 2008 economic crisis, it now affects a wider range of young people than it ever did before, ranging from those with third-level degrees to the most disadvantaged young people. The prevalence of long-term youth unemployment also differs considerably across EU Member States and has been subject to noticeable variations across time. Although the majority of Member States have recorded an increase in long-term youth unemployment rates since the crisis, a number of countries seem to be managing this policy challenge by putting appropriate support measures in place.

What We Know About Rural Youth’s Entry Into Employment

Microlinks
With the launch of the U.S. Government’s Global Food Security Strategy (GFSS) last year, the role of employment and livelihoods has come to the forefront. Given the high presence of youth in the labor force in many GFSS countries, the role of agriculture compared with other sectors in youth employment is receiving increasing attention in programs. USAID’s Chief Economist, in partnership with the Bureau for Food Security (BFS), convened a workshop this past October bringing researchers, USAID staff, and implementers together for an evidence-based exchange on the barriers to youth’s entry into work in rural and peri-urban areas. 
 

Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained: Workforce Transitions in a Time of Automation

McKinsey & Company

Automation is not a new phenomenon, and fears about its transformation of the workplace and effects on employment date back centuries, even before the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the 1960s, US President Lyndon Johnson empaneled a “National Commission on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress.” Among its conclusions was “the basic fact that technology destroys jobs, but not work.”* Fast forward and rapid recent advances in automation technologies, including artificial intelligence, autonomous systems, and robotics are now raising the fears anew—and with new urgency. In our January 2017 report on automation, A future that works: Automation, employment, and productivity, we analyzed the automation potential of the global economy, the timelines over which the phenomenon could play out, and the powerful productivity boost that automation adoption could deliver.

Resource Type: 
Report

Measuring Youth Employment Projects: What Can We Learn from Each Other?

The World Bank

Youth employment projects face varying contextual realities and constraints that often result in generating innovations when adapting and customizing their monitoring and evaluation system. There is a lag in the spread of innovations due to the various contexts, funders, and organizations often operating independently. Project teams find their own solutions to similar rising challenges, which in some instances lead to a medley of methods and conventions in monitoring and evaluation that lack a uniform standard.

Are Colleges Preparing Students for the Automated Future of Work?

The Washington Post
President Trump’s rhetoric about the decline of the working class blames trade, immigration and the outsourcing of American jobs overseas for the decline of the U.S. manufacturing sector. But the bigger culprit is rarely acknowledged by politicians or the media: automation. Nearly 9 in 10 jobs that have disappeared since 2000 were lost to automation, according to a study by Ball State University. As Barack Obama said in his presidential farewell speech in Chicago earlier this year, the next wave of economic dislocations “will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes a lot of good, middle-class jobs obsolete.”

President Trump’s rhetoric about the decline of the working class blames trade, immigration and the outsourcing of American jobs overseas for the decline of the U.S. manufacturing sector.
 
But the bigger culprit is rarely acknowledged by politicians or the media: automation. Nearly 9 in 10 jobs that have disappeared since 2000 were lost to automation, according to a study by Ball State University. As Barack Obama said in his presidential farewell speech in Chicago earlier this year, the next wave of economic dislocations “will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes a lot of good, middle-class jobs obsolete.”

Educating Transformative Entrepreneurs at University

University of Minnesota and the Talloires Network

A growing number of universities around the world offer programmes that educate students to be entrepreneurs. This is an exciting and promising trend in light of the global youth employment crisis. Reliance on existing businesses to create jobs cannot possibly resolve this situation – a focus on business creation is essential. Institutions of higher education need to equip students to create a vast number of new enterprises and new jobs. 

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