FULL LIST OF MONITORING & EVALUATION

This cross-cutting theme focuses on improving the effectiveness, sustainability, and scale of programs by sharing data on what works and what doesn’t, and methodologies for monitoring, evaluation, and impact assessment.   Improved practices in this area promise to provide stakeholders with enhanced understanding of which interventions have meaningful impact, what the likely return on investment will be, and how to design and implement improved monitoring and evaluation initiatives.

Where are we now?

As the YEO field matures, pilot programs and anecdotal data have given way to increasingly sophisticated approaches to program measurement and learning. These advances are critical to scale, replication, policy and government partnership initiatives. However, more work remains. Confusion about the purpose and practice of monitoring, evaluation and assessment, and the way it can contribute to learning with an organization or program still exists.  A common language for this area along with standardized measures of cost and benefit are also necessary to ensure discussions are productive and evaluations reflect a common framework of practice.

Trends and emerging practices

  • Donors are advocating for more rigorous evaluation to ensure greater accountability and learning.
  • Although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard, they can be expensive and time consuming, leading some donors to find quasi-experimental and impact evaluations very appealing, while others invest more significantly in M&E activities.
  • For corporations and foundations, evaluations are important to measure the social value proposition and social impact of their investments to consumers, customers, and employees.
  • More implementers are recognizing the importance of investing in good M&E, so they can demonstrate to donors their organization's social value proposition, particularly to impact investors.
  • More organizations are successfully using mixed methods approaches (both quantitative and qualitative data) to M&E.
  • Survey and focus group tools should be tested and finalized with young people for tools to achieve greater reliability and validity.
  • Data from young people should be triangulated with data from significant adults in their lives (such as parents, guardians, and teachers) to contextualize its meaning and importance.
  • More organizations are recognizing that existing M&E staff may not have the skills set required to engage young people, so training on how to conduct youth-inclusive M&E is important. 
  • Young people are not homogeneous, so questions need to be framed differently for young men and young women, youth from urban and rural communities, and/or youth from different socio-economic groups.

 

Measuring Youth Employment Projects: What Can We Learn from Each Other?

The World Bank

Youth employment projects face varying contextual realities and constraints that often result in generating innovations when adapting and customizing their monitoring and evaluation system. There is a lag in the spread of innovations due to the various contexts, funders, and organizations often operating independently. Project teams find their own solutions to similar rising challenges, which in some instances lead to a medley of methods and conventions in monitoring and evaluation that lack a uniform standard.

Interventions to Improve the Labour Market Outcomes of Youth: A Systematic Review of Training, Entrepreneurship Promotion, Employment Services and Subsidized Employment Interventions

Campbell Collaboration

This Campbell systematic review examines the impact of youth employment interventions on the labour market outcomes of young people and business performance. The review summarises findings from 113 reports of 107 interventions in 31 countries.

 

The Demand-Driven Training Toolkit: A Resource for Aligning Youth Employment Programs with Labor Market Demand

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International
DATE: 
Dec 12, 2017 (09:30am)

With support of the Rockefeller Foundation, Making Cents International developed the Demand-Driven Training for Youth Employment Toolkit, a resource designed to assist education-to-employment providers interested in maximizing program outcomes such as placement and retention rates, satisfaction of em

YouthPower Learning Cross-Sectoral Skills for Youth Community of Practice (CoP) Meeting

ORGANIZER: 
YouthPower Learning
DATE: 
Dec 6, 2017 (09:30am to 12:00pm)

Please join the YouthPower Learning Cross-Sectoral Skills for Youth Community of Practice (CoP) on Wednesday, December 6.

Why Matchmaking in Youth Employment Programs in Middle East North Africa Aren’t Working

Stanford Social Innovation Review

If you come from the Arab region, you will no doubt recognize the term "Khattaba”—the word used to describe the traditional matchmaker who helps a young man find a bride. The Khattaba looks for certain qualifications in the bride-to-be that have been set by the groom or his mother, and holds complete discretion in determining a potential bride’s suitability. The brides have very little say in their futures. And when the marriage struggles or fails, the Khattaba is often blamed for poor judgment.

Household Matters: Revisiting the Returns to Capital among Female Micro-entrepreneurs

Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)

Despite the prevalence of female entrepreneurs in developing countries, recent research suggests that women do not benefit from loans and grants in the same way that men do, leading to questions about the value of offering financial services to female entrepreneurs. Researchers re-examined data from previous studies in Ghana, India, and Sri Lanka to measure the impact of credit and cash grant variations on micro-enterprise profits in households where women were the only entrepreneurs and in households where other members also had a business.

YouthPower Learning Webinar: How to Do Research with Adolescents Living in LMICs

ORGANIZER: 
YouthPower Learning
DATE: 
Nov 16, 2017 (09:30am to 10:30am)

Join YouthPower Learning, UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti,  and Columbia University as we explore what is unique about research with

Youth Voices for Positive Change: An Evidence Based Approach to Developing the Sudanese Youth National Policy

Youth Forum

This session represents the research findings by the Youth Forum Organization to the government for drawing up Sudan’s first National Youth Policy. It is a journey we will take to formulate a new and innovative approach to creating a Sudanese national policy for youth. The aim here is to bring to light the most prominent challenges faced by our youth, and also their aspirations for a policy that will accurately represent them and meet their needs.

Innovative Ways to Learn from Your Evaluation: Before, During, and After

EDC, Asante Africa, Educate!

How can youth programming bridge the disconnect between evaluation and learning? Our organizations are exploring ways to adjust the timing of evaluation to deliver useful information. We will present case studies examining innovative approaches to evaluations that deliver actionable information over time, including:

Putting Money Where the Results Are - Improving Youth Development Outcomes by Tying Funding to Results

Instiglio, Millenium Challenge Corporation

Funders face significant challenges in identifying which programs deliver the best results at the best prices.

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