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3 Questions with Maram Khalil and Al’a Ghazi Hussain Essa: Economic Opportunity for Youth

Chemonics International

Maram Khalil and Al’a Ghazi Hussain Essa are young professionals in Jordan’s hospitality industry. Through the Jordan Building Economic Sustainability through Tourism (BEST) project, they are gaining opportunities for professional development and personal growth. In this blog series highlighting youth economic opportunity, Maram and Al’a reflect on their experience with Jordan BEST’s Pathways to Professionalism Program.

Can you tell us about your career goals and experience as a young professional in Jordan?

Positive Youth Development: What is it? And does it impact youth employability?

Results for Development

On Tuesdays, my colleagues and I take a break from assessing health and education challenges to strategize on the soccer field instead. We’re very good at strategizing, but we’re awful at scoring goals. Soccer, of course, is a sport that requires thoughtful strategy, but a game plan is not very useful without clear communication to execute it, the stamina to run across the field toward the goal, or the skills to kick the ball on target. If we’re going to score, win games and fulfill our goal of making the playoffs, we need that whole package.

Girl Coders Fight Sexual Harassment

USAID

Blerta is the first girl in the Kosovo’s IT sector to ever win a grant to work on a computer application. Since then, she established Girls Coding Kosova in February 2014. Earlier this year, Girls Coding Kosova teamed up with Open Data Kosovo and USAID to develop #EcShlirë (meaning “walk freely” in Albanian), a mobile application for reporting sexual harassment in real time.

Four Ways to Help Put Syria’s Youth Back to Work

World Economic Forum

The war in Syria will end. We don’t know when, but when it does, the challenge of rebuilding this once proud and beautiful country will rest firmly on the shoulders of the children of Syria – the next generation. But with the level of damage it has sustained over the last six years – to its infrastructure, its schools, and its hearts and minds – how do we stop Syria’s next generation from losing their way? During the post-conflict period of regeneration, youth employment will be key.

The Rippling Economic Impacts of Child Marriage

World Bank

Globally, more than 700 million women alive today married before the age of 18. Each year, 15 million additional girls are married as children, the vast majority of them in developing countries. Child marriage is widely considered a violation of human rights, and it is also a major impediment to gender equality. It profoundly affects the opportunities not only of child brides, but also of their children. And, as a study we issued this week concludes, it has significant economic implications as well.

Pakistan Bridges the Gender Divide by Embracing a Digital Economy

World Bank

Standing in line to sign up for the Digital Youth Summit in Peshawar this May, I struck up a conversation with a young woman from Peshawar. I was pleasantly surprised by her level of interest and eagerness in participating at the tech conference.  She was keen to develop an app that would allow her to sell home-based food products at a national level.  She had already gathered a group of friends who would work with her on different aspects of task planning and implementation.  Her enthusiasm was palpable and infectious.

Financial Inclusion for Adolescent Girls – Strategic Insights from Burundi

SEEP Network

Using examples from Burundi, CARE’s POWER Africa (Promoting Opportunities for Women's Economic Empowerment in Rural Africa) team shares how innovative, community-led conflict resolution creates a foundation for sustainable and inclusive gender equality, contributing to social and financial advancement of the entire community.

How Do You Get Girls to School in the Least Educated Country on Earth?

The Guardian

Maybe, Rakia Soumana sometimes thinks, life could have been a little different. It’s not so bad in Tessa, her village in rural Niger, where she lives with her three children, her husband, his first wife Halimatou Soumana, and Halimatou’s five children. The wives get along, each doing more than their share of household chores when the other one is pregnant or has just given birth, and Rakia, 30, wants at least two more children because it will put her family on equal footing with Halimatou’s. She likes her husband, but she’s dependent on him, and the weight of her daily workload is heavy.

More Than Lighting: Women Entrepreneurs Turn Solar Technology Into Opportunity

Next Billion

For the more than 1.2 billion people in the world living without electricity, lighting at night is a huge challenge. Many rural homes rely on kerosene lamps, which cast poor light, can be toxic to their users and, when knocked over, burn some 2.2 million children a year. Among the world’s poorest people, purchasing kerosene can consume up to a third of their total income.

Bridging the STEM and ICT gender gap in Tanzania

Internatinoal Telecommunication Union (ITU)

Tanzania is currently facing an undeniable challenge: there are few girls in the information and communication technology (ICT) field, and those who want to join the field often opt instead for roles that commonly have limited vacancies, like doctor’s positions. This leads to a scarcity of female role models who have thrived in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and ICT.

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