FULL LIST OF GENDER

This cross-cutting theme addresses the role that gender plays in shaping economic opportunities, especially for adolescent girls and young women. Understanding the importance of gender in youth economic opportunities programming helps stakeholders identify constraints and opportunities that can increase effective participation levels of both sexes, or determine when sex-specific programs are most appropriate.

Where are we now?

With a population of nearly 7 billion people, adolescent girls, young women, and older women—in their multiple roles as workers, caregivers, and mothers—are critical to sustainable economic development. Talent is one of the most important determinants of competitiveness. Countries that can garner innovation and creativity, and leverage the economic participation of its entire population are more likely to succeed in today’s challenging global landscape. For example, the Nike Foundation found that if young Nigerian women had the same employment rates as young men, the country would add US $13.9 billion annually.1 Thus, the case for empowering girls and young women and leveraging their talent is compelling because it makes both economic and social sense.

Trends and Emerging Practices

  • Girls as young as ten are economic participants in their households and capable of saving.  By recognizing girls as economic participants, organizations can provide them with access to both financial literacy and savings offerings they require to mitigate risk later in life.
  • Investing in young women pays off for their families as well. Women invest 90% of their earnings back into their families compared to men who invest 30% or 40%.2
  • Girls who are less financially dependent are at less risk of HIV infection and negative effects of early pregnancy and child bearing.
  • Adolescent girls and young women must be differentiated. Girls face unique challenges and are at distinct developmental and life stages that need tailored programming. There are very few studies or statistics that paint an accurate picture of the lives of girls and the impacts of programs on them and their communities.
  • Disaggregation of data by both age and gender shows evidence for more effective program investments. Studies by groups, such as the Population Council, indicate that many organizations inadvertently favor older and male youth participants in their programs, many of whom have already benefitted from support. Married and less visible young women, on the other hand, are often unable to access programs. 
  • Any program designed to benefit young women should take into consideration what needs to happen with community stakeholders, the role of men and boys in that community, and what kinds of strategies will ensure girls benefit from the program and gain support of the community to thrive in ways that may challenge cultural and societal norms.
  • For very vulnerable young women – diversifying income sources, developing self-confidence, and acquiring assets in the form of savings are likely better indicators of improvement than income itself.

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

Demographic Dividend: Why Investing in Children, Youth Benefits Nation

IPP Media
Tanzania and Africa’s development at large lies with the well-being of its today’s children and youth.
 
The prospect of socio-economic transformation of the continent rests with investing in the young people of the continent.
 
Today’s investment in youth and children is tomorrow’s peace, stability, security, democracy, and sustainable development including reaping the demographic dividend.
 
Resource Type: 
Article

Dreams Deterred: Opportunities to Promote Self-Reliance for Somali Refugee Youth in Kenya

International Rescue Committee (IRC)

Somali refugees in Kenya currently find themselves in limbo with only restrictive and impractical options available to them. The majority of these refugees are unable to return to Somalia, despite recent efforts by the Governments of Kenya and Somalia and UNHCR, due to sustained threats to their protection, safety and dignity in what continues to be a fragile post-conflict situation. Opportunities for third country resettlement are concurrently diminishing, particularly in Europe and the United States of America, due to a sharp decline in refugee resettlement quotas.

Resource Type: 
Report

The Youth Entrepreneurship and Self-Employment Forum

ORGANIZER: 
International Labour Organization
DATE: 
Nov 13, 2018 (08:00am) to Nov 14, 2018 (06:00pm)

Join us at the YES Forum to learn more about youth entrepreneurship policies, improving access to finance for young entrepreneurs and facilitating access to markets. The two-day programme will include plenary sessions, inspirational talks, a marketplace for key actors, and a pitching competition for young entrepreneurs. The YES Forum is a featured event of the Global Entrepreneurship Week and is jointly organized by the ILO, ITC, UNCDF, UNCTAD and UNIDO under the aegis of the Global Initiative on Decent Jobs for Youth.

Four Ways to Promote Girls' Access to New Economic Opportunities

Feed the Future Knowledge-Driven Agricultural Development Project, MarketLinks

The Making Cents International 2018 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit (GYEO) galvanized important conversations about how to foster and promote entrepreneurship, skills, resiliency, solutions, and excitement to create employment opportunities. Many of the Summit breakout sessions concentrated specifically on girls’ economic empowerment and how changemakers, foundations, implementing partners, and communities can mobilize around youth through a gendered lens.

Resource Type: 
Article

Achieving Gender Equality by 2030: Putting Adolescents on the Agenda

ORGANIZER: 
Global Early Adolescent Study
DATE: 
Nov 12, 2018 (07:45am to 09:30am)

This side event focuses on the key role of adolescents in Sustainable Development Goal 5: Achieve Gender Equality and Empowerment of all Women and Girls by 2030.

Education Finance: Building the Business Case for Educating Girls and Equipping Them with Financial and Entrepreneurial Skills

Opportunity International, Private Education Development Network

263 million children out of school, a ballooning under-15 population, and governments unable to keep pace with education demands. Education Finance plays a critical role in getting and keeping every child in school. Opportunity International (Opportunity) has been championing education finance for 10 years and disbursed more than 190,000 loans to schools and parents through profitable portfolios with minimal risk and high social impact. Opportunity's work with DFID's Girls' Education Challenge provides gender-neutral financial services for families and schools in Uganda.

Resource Type: 
Presentation

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