FULL LIST OF ADOLESCENT GIRLS

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Girl Coders Fight Sexual Harassment

USAID

Blerta is the first girl in the Kosovo’s IT sector to ever win a grant to work on a computer application. Since then, she established Girls Coding Kosova in February 2014. Earlier this year, Girls Coding Kosova teamed up with Open Data Kosovo and USAID to develop #EcShlirë (meaning “walk freely” in Albanian), a mobile application for reporting sexual harassment in real time.

The Rippling Economic Impacts of Child Marriage

World Bank

Globally, more than 700 million women alive today married before the age of 18. Each year, 15 million additional girls are married as children, the vast majority of them in developing countries. Child marriage is widely considered a violation of human rights, and it is also a major impediment to gender equality. It profoundly affects the opportunities not only of child brides, but also of their children. And, as a study we issued this week concludes, it has significant economic implications as well.

A Global Desk Review of Financial Education’s Contribution to Girls’ Economic Empowerment

Aflatoun International

This global review is part of the thought leadership component of the Credit Suisse Financial Education for Girls (CSFEG) program. The purpose of this work is to provide recommendations regarding the design, implementation and research on programs for adolescent girls aged 10 to 18 that aim to contribute to their economic empowerment by containing a financial education component. Presented here are the findings from research into selected, highlighting key financial education program models.

Financial Inclusion for Adolescent Girls – Strategic Insights from Burundi

SEEP Network

Using examples from Burundi, CARE’s POWER Africa (Promoting Opportunities for Women's Economic Empowerment in Rural Africa) team shares how innovative, community-led conflict resolution creates a foundation for sustainable and inclusive gender equality, contributing to social and financial advancement of the entire community.

Bridging the STEM and ICT gender gap in Tanzania

Internatinoal Telecommunication Union (ITU)

Tanzania is currently facing an undeniable challenge: there are few girls in the information and communication technology (ICT) field, and those who want to join the field often opt instead for roles that commonly have limited vacancies, like doctor’s positions. This leads to a scarcity of female role models who have thrived in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and ICT.

Breaking the STEM Ceiling for Girls

Brookings

Although countries have dramatically closed gender gaps in education and labor force participation, gender differences within education and employment persist. Women earn less income and work in lower paying occupations and sectors than men do. Women are less likely to become entrepreneurs, and, when they do, they typically run smaller, less-profitable firms. These gender gaps in entrepreneurship, incomes, and productivity persist at all levels of development, despite a multitude of policies aimed at eliminating them.

Lifecycle of Girls' Economic Empowerment

Plan International
ECONOMIC VIOLENCE BEGINS IN GIRLHOOD
It’s critical to enable an environment that promotes economic justice for women from early in life. Failure to address the economic violence that manifests in girlhood will have lasting effects throughout women’s and girls’ lives.
 

Financial Education + Life Skills = Girl Power

Aflatoun

It’s 8 March 2017, International Women’s Day. As my colleague David beautifully said: “It’s a day to remember that women are not treated equally to men across the world. It’s a reminder that women worldwide are exposed to shocking abuse from sexual violence and female genital mutilation, to forced early marriage and deprivation of their most basic rights.

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