FULL LIST OF SOFT SKILLS

Recent research shows that soft skills can have a greater impact on an individual’s employment, earnings, and overall well-being than job-specific technical skills. In fact, employers globally report difficulty filling jobs because new recruits often lack soft skills. According to Child Trends, soft skills include “competencies, behaviors, attitudes and personal qualities that enable people to effectively navigate their environment, work well with others, perform well, and achieve their goals.” Researchers, educators and youth development practitioners use varying frameworks to classify the ‘most important’ soft skills. This is demonstrated by the multitude of names often considered synonymous with soft skills, including: non-cognitive, workforce readiness, life, behavioral, and 21st century skills (among others). Examples of the most valuable types of soft skills to youth and adult success are: social skills, communication skills, problem solving, critical thinking, self-control, and positive self-concept.

 

Annual Research and Policy Symposium: Skills for a Changing World

ORGANIZER: 
Brookings Institute
DATE: 
Apr 5, 2017 (09:00am to 05:00pm)
Education systems across the world are undertaking transformations in order to develop essential skills and competencies in students to be successful in the 21st century. This global movement is reacting to and preparing for changing social, technological, and economic demands. In order to be effective, the full breadth of skills, from literacy and numeracy to creativity, collaboration, and problem solving, must be cultivated across age groups and learning environments, including school, community, home, and society at large.
 

Breaking the Double Barrier of Poverty

Stanford Social Innovation Review
Instead of prescribing higher education as the silver-bullet solution to poverty, we must provide diverse and contextualized pathways to disadvantaged children, enabling them to redefine the dominant narrative of success.
 

Youth Economic Opportunities Network 2016 Report

Making Cents International
Making Cents International is committed to meeting the needs of the global youth population by developing and supporting evidence-based, scalable, and sustainable initiatives. For ten years, our Youth Economic Opportunities Network (YEO Network) has contributed to the capacity of youth development stakeholders to design, implement, and evaluate high-impact youth economic opportunity programs, policies, and partnerships.
 
Resource Type: 
Report

Augmented Learning and Teaching the Skills of the 21st Century

Center for Work Ethic Development, Georgetown

As the economy becomes increasingly automated, employment skills for both blue and white collar jobs must evolve to keep up. So-called “21st-century skills” learning rotates away from hard STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and incorporates soft skills to augment the progression of technology.

Early Childhood Engagement for Lifelong Learning

Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)

From conception to five years of age, early childhood is an extremely important period for cognitive and psychosocial development. Children’s high levels of brain plasticity and neurogenesis make them especially receptive to external stimuli. Young children’s minds are still learning how to learn, and simple play activities that stimulate the brain through all the senses can help improve their ability to think, communicate, and connect with others. Research from around the world suggests that guaranteeing such early childhood stimulation is critical.

The Skills that Matter in the Race Between Education and Technology

Brookings & World Bank

The threat of automation implies a race between education and technology. In most developing countries, education systems are not providing workers with the skills necessary to compete in today’s job markets. The growing mismatch between the demand and supply of skills holds back economic growth and undermines opportunity. At the same time, the returns to schooling are high in most developing countries, and growing skill premiums are evident in much of the world.

The Syrian Refugee Crisis in Lebanon: Empowering Youth to Serve as Agents of Change

The World Bank

There was silence in the room. No one seemed to want to speak up. I asked again: “what are the most important challenges that you face every day?” Suba, a young woman in her early 20s living in Tripoli, one of the regions with the highest poverty levels and concentration of Syrian refugees in Lebanon, finally raised her hand and said: “We are unemployed and have no access to basic services. We are sympathetic to the Syrian refugee cause. However, they are taking our jobs.

ADVANCING ADOLESCENTS: Evidence on the Impact of Psychosocial Support for Syrian Refugee and Jordanian Adolescents

Mercy Corps

Jordan is hosting one of the largest populations of Syrians in the region – more than 650,000 people, of which 28% are between the ages of 11 and 25. This refugee population faces severe challenges. A staggering 93% of refugees living outside the camps are under the Jordanian poverty line. Most are living in host communities absent strong family and social networks. Syrians also face tensions with Jordanians in host communities that are competing for scarce resources ranging from access to water, jobs and education.

The Power Skills in An Age of Disruption

PYXERA Global
“Almost 43 percent of the global youth labor force is either unemployed or working, yet living in poverty,” according to Global Employment Trends for Youth 2015 by the International Labour Organization. In countries with mature economies, nearly one in five students don’t acquire a minimum level of basic skills needed to be gainfully employed.
 

Handbook for Effective Incorporation of Social-emotional Competencies in Youth Employability Programs for Disadvantaged Youth

NEO

The handbook consists of three chapters. The first chapter explores the social and productive context and the social-emotional competencies and training objective that arise from this context. It also presents some approaches to defining these competencies. The second chapter explores the incorporation of social-emotional competencies into youth employability programs.

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