FULL LIST OF ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

Enterprise development programs help entrepreneurs to start and run profitable businesses through training, technical assistance, and inclusive market development activities. While the dynamism and innovation that entrepreneurs bring to an economy are one reason to implement activities in this area, the inability of the formal sector to produce enough jobs for the growing youth population makes self-employment an important option for youth as well.

Where We Are Now?

Similar to the general enterprise and market development field, youth enterprise development has moved from a focus solely on the enterprise itself to a more holistic approach. While providing training or technical assistance to an entrepreneur is still important, practitioners are complementing these types of assistance with activities to strengthen an enterprise’s overall ecosystem. For example, projects now include initiatives to strengthen entrepreneurs’ networks, so that they can gain business or mentoring assistance as necessary, or focus on strengthening the overall value chain specific to youth enterprises.

Trends and Best Practices:

  • Not all entrepreneurs are created equal. Many youth start businesses out of necessity and are unlikely to grow their business beyond the micro-stage. A smaller subset are more entrepreneurial minded and given the right set of circumstances, have a greater chance to develop a successful small enterprise. Practitioners and donors are distinguishing between these types of individuals and providing different types of support to each.
  • Successful young entrepreneurs capitalize on their passion and market opportunities. Successful programs recognize this and help develop opportunities in areas that are naturally interesting to youth, or work to educate youth that more traditional activities, such as agriculture, can be both inspiring and remunerative.
  • Successful capacity building initiatives help entrepreneurs obtain the information they need and have the skills to manipulate it for business success.
  • Entrepreneurs require the skills to both run a profitable business and a financially stable household.
  • USAID and other donors have begun incorporating youth inclusion activities to value chain projects in a more robust way. By integrating a “youth lens” in value chain assessments, implementers are able to identify constraints and opportunities specific to youth and beyond those that apply to value chain actors more broadly.

 

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

Making Cents International

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Educating Transformative Entrepreneurs at University

University of Minnesota and the Talloires Network

A growing number of universities around the world offer programmes that educate students to be entrepreneurs. This is an exciting and promising trend in light of the global youth employment crisis. Reliance on existing businesses to create jobs cannot possibly resolve this situation – a focus on business creation is essential. Institutions of higher education need to equip students to create a vast number of new enterprises and new jobs. 

2018 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International
DATE: 
Sep 25, 2018 (All day) to Sep 27, 2018 (All day)

On September 25-27, 2018 the Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit will return for its 12th annual convening in Washington, D.C. Each year, over 550 youth and economic development experts from more than 50 countries gather at the Summit to advance youth social and economic inclusion. Summit attendees expand their global network, exchange knowledge, gain exposure to emerging issues and innovative new tools, and build their technical practice through interactive, hands-on learning. 

What Does An Increasingly Informal World of Work Mean for Sustainable Youth Livelihoods?

Making Cents International
In September, Making Cents International convened our 11th annual Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit (GYEO Summit). Our Summit theme, “The Future of Work: Youth Economic Opportunities in a Changing World of Work” acknowledged the big global trends associated with “the future of work”, and explored how the demographic, structural, and technical impacts of these changes affect young people in developing contexts.
 

Setting Young People on a Path to Lifelong Success

Stanford Social Innovation Review

The access and opportunities that help many of us get ahead in life are not equally available to those living in under-resourced communities. Structural racial, ethnic, gender, and economic inequities in these communities often stand in the way of the dream of business ownership, and the independence and self-reliance that can come with being entrepreneurial.

Household Matters: Revisiting the Returns to Capital among Female Micro-entrepreneurs

Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)

Despite the prevalence of female entrepreneurs in developing countries, recent research suggests that women do not benefit from loans and grants in the same way that men do, leading to questions about the value of offering financial services to female entrepreneurs. Researchers re-examined data from previous studies in Ghana, India, and Sri Lanka to measure the impact of credit and cash grant variations on micro-enterprise profits in households where women were the only entrepreneurs and in households where other members also had a business.

The Role of Volunteer Business Mentoring in Supporting Youth Entrepreneurship: A Global Perspective

Youth Business International, Middlesex University

Middlesex University Business School (MUBS) and the Centre for Enterprise and Economic Development Research (CEEDR) were commissioned by Youth Business International (YBI) in November 2015 to conduct a global longitudinal study to understand ‘what works, where and why’ of how voluntary business mentoring (VBM) assists young entrepreneurs, both in terms of their business start-up and development, but also their personal development and entrepreneurial journey. The team will set out the results of the first phase of the research project, indicting:

The Myth of Lazy Youth: Why Young People Choose Agriculture

Overseas Development Institute, Participatory Development Associates

All too often young people are accused of being lazy and uninterested in agriculture, when in fact there are very good reasons why they are unable to access the opportunities available in the agricultural sector or why they are unable to attain the profits that theoretically should be achievable.

Pages