FULL LIST OF UNEMPLOYMENT

BLOG: GE Foundation and ILO Launch Global Youth Internship Programme, July 2016

International Labor Organization

To help inspire and prepare young people for a rapidly changing and highly competitive job market, the GE Foundation is launching an innovative learning programme to provide 16 to 18 year olds with a practical work experiences in STEM careers for the workforce of tomorrow. On the occasion of the UN’s World Youth Skills Day , the GE Foundation in partnership with the International Labour Organization (ILO), have committed to quality, workplace-based experience for an under-served and critical age group. The programme, called the Global Youth Internship Programme, will start in Boston, to be managed by the Boston Private Industry Council, and then expand globally in partnership with international NGOs. 

REPORT: Youth, Employment and Migration In Mogadishu, Kismayo and Baidoa

Altai Consulting for IOM Somalia

This research project aims to study the relationship between youth, employment and migration, looking at three main questions: 1) Who constitutes the youth workforce in Somalia, and are these young people satisfied with their situation? 2) How can the economic situation of dissatisfied youth be explained: is the source of the problem structural (not enough demand), or does it result from frictions within the labour market? Can youth create their own job opportunities through entrepreneurship? 3) Does dissatisfaction with occupation and level of income, along with difficulties to navigate the job market, alone explain irregular migration amongst youth?

Resource Type: 
Report

BLOG: Training Program: Fighting Youth Underemployment in Rwanda

ONE

Indego Africa’s Vocational Training program, which launched in February 2016, provides young, unemployed Rwandans with artisan skills training and business education to help them build careers in the artisan sector and gain financial independence. How does it all work? Here’s the scoop: The program runs on six-month semesters with 45 participants per semester. Three days per week, these young people receive artisan vocational training at Indego Africa partner cooperatives—the artisan businesses responsible for the bright baskets, accessories and apparel you see on our website.

BLOG: Kenya Secures Sh36bn Loan to Cut Youth Jobless Rate, July 2016

Daily Nation

Kenya has signed a Sh36 billion financing agreement with the World Bank to facilitate youth employment, health and education amid concerns over the high level of public debt. The project will respond to high numbers of new young entrants to the labour market who are presently outpacing capacity of the economy to absorb them in productive employment,” said Mr Rotich. The money signed  between Treasury Secretary Henry Rotich and World Bank country director Diarietou Gaye  include loans worth Sh31.89 billion and a grant of Sh4.11 billion.

BLOG: The Future of Work for Youth in Africa, July 2016

ASHOKA

African countries are experiencing the issue in varying degrees. Education and infrastructure problems are often cited. However, members of Future Forward, a network of leading social entrepreneurs, youth-serving professionals, and youth changemakers across Africa, have pinpointed a key — and often ignored — challenge: young people in Africa lack the opportunity to become authentic leaders.In other words, young people don’t have many options when it comes to leadership opportunities, in part due to mindsets around the capabilities of youth. 

REPORT: Youth Think Tank Report 2015-2016, June 2016

The MasterCard Foundation

The MasterCard Foundation Youth Think Tank is a research group made up of young people who are recruited to conduct research in their communities, make recommendations based on their findings, and advise the Foundation. The 2015-2016 Youth Think Tank conducted research into economic opportunities for youth in East Africa and found that young people across the region face similar aspirations and challenges.

Resource Type: 
Report

FELLOWSHIP: Overseas Fellowship with Atlas Corps, June 2016

Atlas Corps

Atlas Corps seeks nonprofit/NGO professionals from around the world to apply for Fellowships in the U.S. Atlas Corps engages leaders committed to the nonprofit sector in 6-18 month, professional fellowships at organizations to learn best practices, build organizational capacity, and return home to create a network of global leaders. Fellows serve at Host Organizations working on issues that complement their expertise. This prestigious fellowship includes a living stipend to cover basic expenses (food, local transportation, and shared housing) and health insurance.

BLOG: Skills Training and Economic Restructuring to Create Jobs for Young People in Africa

INCLUDE

Africa is a ‘youthful’ continent. In 2015, the number of African youth aged 15–24 years was estimated at 229.6 million, or 19.4% of the total population, with the 486 million children under 15 years making up another 40.9%. Moreover, unlike in other parts of the world where youth populations have plateaued or are in decline, the proportion of youth in Africa is expected to continue to rise in the coming decade. Thus, if only because of their numerical strength, young people’s choices, opportunities and challenges will be crucial in shaping the future of their countries. 

BLOG: University Degrees are not the Answer for Africa’s Unemployed Youth, June 2016

Quartz Africa

As a child, my friend Fola was good at math and excelled in the sciences and he wanted to be an engineer. But losing both his parents before the age of 15 changed everything. He was forced to adapt to a new and limited scope of opportunities available to him, both academically and financially. As he did, he learned how to deal with the trauma, adversity and setbacks and he built a high level of resilience. There are so many people like Fola who are bright and motivated, but due to challenging circumstances may not have a typical CV or resumé listing the universities they attended and the financial firms where they’ve worked.

BLOG: The Impact of Family on Dream Jobs, May 2016

RTI International

The impact of family influence on youth development is well documented in major evidence reviews (see those by JPALUSAID3ie; and the World Bank). Families impact nutritional and cognitive development, education and career choice parameters, social and geographic mobility, household and childcare responsibilities, and finance, savings, and income constraints, most of which vary by gender. Elements of family pride, saving face, and giving back also clearly play a role.

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