FULL LIST OF UNEMPLOYMENT

PRESENTATION: Unlocking the Double Hidden Potential of SMEs for Labor Absorption at Scale, Sep 2016

Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator

Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are often not the first consideration in thinking about inclusive youth employment; their size, diffusion, and accessibility detract from their attractiveness. Yet they have powerful potential not just for labour absorption but for growth stimulus - in South Africa over 50% of hiring is done by SMEs, and approximately 70% identify hiring as the stimulus for their growth. This session will present an emerging solution for linking SME employers and young marginalised work-seekers, and explore the challenges and responses for working with this sector. 

Resource Type: 
Presentation

PRESENTATION: Microwork Boom or Bust? Examining the State of the Art Emerging Online Platform that is Transforming Youth Employment, Sep 2016

Samasource, TripAdvisor, Banyan Global, Future Work Consulting, RTI International

Youth unemployment remains a major challenge for many developing economies that cannot create enough jobs to absorb the emerging labor market. Microwork, an online outsourcing of services, is an industry that expands entry level jobs.  However, no comprehensive resources currently exist to prepare youth for succeeding in this industry. RTI International, Future Work Consulting and Banyan Global experts will present findings from a Center for Global Youth Employment-funded study mapping the current trends, challenges and success factors surrounding microwork.  The panel will synthesize the study’s findings determining microwork’s sustainability as an effective tool for transitioning disadvantaged youth into employment. 

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Presentation

PRESENTATION: Innovative Methods for Sourcing Youth Participants for Employment Programs, Sep 2016

Education For Employment, The MasterCard Foundation

Effective sourcing of participants is critical for supporting quality at scale for youth employment programs. In this workshop, Education For Employment (EFE) will present three tested methods for sourcing marginalized youth populations for participation in employment programs: social media-based approaches, high-touch family-focused sourcing strategies, and outreach workshops. In addition, The MasterCard Foundation will present lessons learned from the Foundation’s experience supporting youth employment programs in Africa. EFE’s experience applying tested approaches in Jordan, Tunisia, and Morocco will be discussed, and evaluative approaches for determining the relative effectiveness of each strategy will be examined. Special attention will be paid to gender aspects of each sourcing strategy. This workshop will adopt a Think Tank approach.

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Presentation

PRESENTATION: A Cost-Effective Approach to Improving Youth Employment Outcomes, Sep 2016

Chemonics International, The Pragma Corporation, USAID Middle East Bureau

The youth employment crisis in the Middle East and North Africa stems from problems on both the demand side (insufficient market activity to create jobs) and the supply side (youth lack skills/experiences that private sector demands). In Year 1, the USAID/Tunisia Business Reform and Competitiveness Program (BRCP) used an approach that addresses these simultaneously to create nearly 4,000 jobs, at a cost-per-job of $1,207. Presenters will discuss key elements of this approach, the comparative cost effectiveness of enterprise-competitiveness programs, tools for design/implementation, and BRCP's experience leveraging enterprise competitiveness activities to strengthen the youth ecosystem in Tunisia. 

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Presentation

REPORT: Expanding Economic Opportunity for Youth Through Summer Jobs, September 2016

JPMORGAN CHASE & CO

Every summer, millions of young people across the United States look forward to getting their first job—an important early work experience that can put them on the path to a meaningful career. Despite signs of an economic recovery, nearly 20 percent of young people who want to work cannot get jobs. Summer youth employment programs (SYEP) help to address this challenge by connecting youth to opportunities to build skills and gain work experience. However, most cities cannot keep up with the demand for positions, especially for summer jobs that are linked to career pathways.

Resource Type: 
Report

REPORT: Reducing Youth Unemployment in South Africa, September 2016

FSG and The Rockefeller Foundation

Youth unemployment not only limits the earnings potential and future prospects of a new generation of South Africans, it also stymies business growth, threatens social cohesion, and puts pressure on government resources. Yet data shows that there are half a million entry-level jobs vacant in the country, and with it, a real opportunity to expand economic inclusion. This paper looks at the efforts of government, employers, philanthropic funders, and training providers to bridge the gap between available jobs and first-time work-seekers.  It shows that the most impactful interventions take place when these actors join forces and highlights two examples of cross-sectoral partnerships: EOH Youth Job Creation Initiative and Mentec Foundation. 

Resource Type: 
Report

BLOG: Senegal: A Rural Youth Employment Policy Champion, September 2016

Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

In line with the Plan Sénégal Émergent, the main medium to long term social and economic policy in the country, the Rural Youth Employment Policy bases itself on four main pillars: (i) economic stimulus for job creation; (ii) investment in human capital; (iii) strengthen rural youth participation in policy and decision-making in the country; and, (iv) streamlining the governance framework for effective action towards rural youth employment creation. The final goal is to guide the support to create from 100,000 to 150,000 jobs per year.

BLOG: There's a Global Youth Unemployment Crisis. Here's What we can do About it, September 2016

World Economic Forum & Huffington Post

Unemployment — and the lack of necessary skills for employment, particularly among youth under age 25 — is one of the issues I hear about most as I speak with world leaders, hotel owners and employees in the thousands of communities where Hilton operates. It’s no surprise why: The Economist estimates that there may be as many as 290 million 15-to-24-year-olds not participating in the labor market. These 290 million bright minds — a group almost as large as the U.S. 

REPORT: World Employment and Social Outlook for Youth 2016, August 2016

International Labour Organization-Geneva

The ILO's "World Employment and Social Outlook 2016: Trends for Youth" provides updated figures on global and regional youth unemployment. It also looks at working poverty rates, decent work opportunities in both developed and developing economies as well as gender inequalities and migration trends among young people. Global economic growth in 2016 is estimated to stand at 3.2 per cent, 0.4 percentage points lower than the figure predicted in late 2015. The downward revision is a result of recessions that were deeper than expected in some key emerging commodity-exporting countries, including Argentina, Brazil and the Russian Federation. 

Resource Type: 
Report

BLOG: Youth Paving the Road to 2030, August 2016

The World Bank

Young people are up to 4 times more likely to be unemployed than adults. And, even when they find work, it is more often insecure or in the informal economy where pay is low, conditions variable, and benefits non-existent.  The ILO estimates that nearly a third of youth who are employed are still poor, living below $4 a day. Young women are often at a disadvantage with prospects further marred by educational, social, and institutional constraints: as many as 85% percent of young women in the Middle East and North Africa, South Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa regions are working in vulnerable employment.  

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