FULL LIST OF YOUTH

BLOG: How to Design Youth Employment Programs, Dec 2016

World Bank

After three and half years of work, we have finally completed our systematic review of youth employment programs. Many thanks to the co-authors who did the heavy lifting (Jose Manuel Romero, Jonathan StöterauFelix Weidenkaff and Marc Witte). The paper was presented at our recent Jobs and Development Conference. The team went over 40,000 papers to eventually find 103 that reported on credible impact evaluations of youth employment programs. These were more-or-less equally focused on high and middle/low income countries. These studies were codified in detail, including programs’ design features so that we could understand why some worked and others did not.

PROGRAM: Youth Champions Initiative, Jan 2017

Rise Up

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the Public Health Institute have partnered to launch a second cohort of the Youth Champions Initiative – an exciting initiative to advance innovation and quality in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights globally. The Youth Champions Initiative (YCI) invests in visionary young champions who lead the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement now and for the next generation. Following a competitive selection process, YCI will select 18 visionary young people working in Packard Foundation priority geographies – India (BiharUttar Pradesh, New Delhi), Ethiopia (Oromiya and Addis Ababa), Pakistan (Karachi), and the United States (Louisiana and Mississippi).

BLOG: In Zambia, Agribusiness Creates Potential for Job Growth, Dec 2016

World Bank

Zambia is currently under pressure to increase the pace of the economic transformation to create more productive jobs. Despite rapid economic growth from 2000-2013, the country is struggling to provide the kind of jobs needed to help spur sustainable growth and development.  The landlocked country is also one of Africa’s youngest countries by median age, and youth (aged 15-24) who are a significant and increasing share of the working population, are finding it hard to get jobs.

BLOG: Making the Future of Work More Inclusive and Equitable, Dec 2016

World Bank

There is much speculation about what share of jobs might be automated by increasingly smart machines. One estimate suggests that countries such as the U.S. would see almost half of today’s jobs disappearing, while another estimate suggests that this might be just about one in ten jobs. But less is known about who will lose their jobs due to these transitions. And more critically, what might happen to the bottom 40 percent of the population of emerging countries that have only recently been exposed to basic digital technologies? Will they gain from technological progress, or will they face the negative effects of both exclusion and of others—countries or the better off—pulling ahead?

BLOG: How Slatecube is Solving Nigeria's Unemployment Problem, Dec 2016

News Week

In August, when Chris Kwekowe met Bill Gates during a television interview that featured some of Africa’s brightest young entrepreneurs, he didn’t ask the Microsoft founder for a job or business advice. Instead, the 23-year-old Nigerian told Gates how he had turned down a software engineer role at Microsoft.“[Gates] was really intrigued, and he smiled,” says Kwekowe, 23. “After the program, all the directors were like, ‘Dude, you mean you actually turned down a job at Microsoft and had the guts to tell Bill Gates ?”

BLOG: Can the Mobile Phone Call Youth Back to the Farm? Dec 2016

Next Billion

According to online media over recent years, youth are fleeing farms across the developing world. Young people report that they view agriculture as a dirty job, one that’s unattractive, risky and low-paying. They feel there’s little access to the financial services, information and communication tools required to excel in the field. These beliefs are often exacerbated by their parents, who expect that sending their children to school will automatically lead to less labor-intensive jobs.

GUIDE: Youth Guide to the Global Goals, Dec 2016

Youth Service America

The SDGs build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and aim to go further to end all forms of poverty. The new Goals are unique in that they call for action by all countries - regardless of income - to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and addresses a range of social needs including education, health, social protection, and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and environmental protection.

Opinion: Why is Demand-Driven Training Like a Long-term Marriage?, Dec 2016

Fiona Macaulay, Devex

By demand-driven training, I mean those skills development initiatives that are customized to respond directly to specific requirements of a job role for an employer or a group of employers and place trainees into a job. I have taken a deep dive over the past five years into understanding what’s different about “demand-driven training” for disadvantaged young adults compared to other workforce development initiatives. For the demand-driven training model to work, training providers must have corporate partners ready to invest time and effort to align their values and objectives, overcome differences, and find ways to work well together.

REPORT: 2016 Report on the World Social Situation, Dec 2016

United Nations

Humankind has achieved unprecedented social progress over the past several decades. Poverty has declined dramatically around the world and people are healthier, more educated and better connected than ever before. However, this progress has been uneven. Social and economic inequalities persist and, in many cases, have worsened. Virtually everywhere, some individuals and groups confront barriers that prevent them from fully participating in economic, social and political life. Against this backdrop, inclusiveness and shared prosperity have emerged as core aspirations of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 

Resource Type: 
Report

Summit: G(irls)20 Summit 2017 in Germany, Dec 2016

Clinton Global Initiative

The G(irls)20 Summit, a G(irls)20 flagship program, takes place annually in the G20 host country. Designed G20 style, the Summit brings together one delegate from each G20 country, plus a representative from the European and African Unions, Afghanistan, Pakistan and the MENA region. G(irls)20 Summit delegates are all girls, aged 18-23. Held in advance of the G20 Leaders’ meeting, the summit provides a unique opportunity for young female delegates from 20+ countries to make recommendations to G20 Leaders on how to increase female labor force participation - a key to economic growth - reduce poverty and increase a country’s GDP. The G(irls)20 Summit is a response to the G20 Leader’s commitment of 2014 to create 100 million new jobs for women by 2025.

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