FULL LIST OF MONITORING & EVALUATION

This cross-cutting theme focuses on improving the effectiveness, sustainability, and scale of programs by sharing data on what works and what doesn’t, and methodologies for monitoring, evaluation, and impact assessment.   Improved practices in this area promise to provide stakeholders with enhanced understanding of which interventions have meaningful impact, what the likely return on investment will be, and how to design and implement improved monitoring and evaluation initiatives.

Where are we now?

As the YEO field matures, pilot programs and anecdotal data have given way to increasingly sophisticated approaches to program measurement and learning. These advances are critical to scale, replication, policy and government partnership initiatives. However, more work remains. Confusion about the purpose and practice of monitoring, evaluation and assessment, and the way it can contribute to learning with an organization or program still exists.  A common language for this area along with standardized measures of cost and benefit are also necessary to ensure discussions are productive and evaluations reflect a common framework of practice.

Trends and emerging practices

  • Donors are advocating for more rigorous evaluation to ensure greater accountability and learning.
  • Although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard, they can be expensive and time consuming, leading some donors to find quasi-experimental and impact evaluations very appealing, while others invest more significantly in M&E activities.
  • For corporations and foundations, evaluations are important to measure the social value proposition and social impact of their investments to consumers, customers, and employees.
  • More implementers are recognizing the importance of investing in good M&E, so they can demonstrate to donors their organization's social value proposition, particularly to impact investors.
  • More organizations are successfully using mixed methods approaches (both quantitative and qualitative data) to M&E.
  • Survey and focus group tools should be tested and finalized with young people for tools to achieve greater reliability and validity.
  • Data from young people should be triangulated with data from significant adults in their lives (such as parents, guardians, and teachers) to contextualize its meaning and importance.
  • More organizations are recognizing that existing M&E staff may not have the skills set required to engage young people, so training on how to conduct youth-inclusive M&E is important. 
  • Young people are not homogeneous, so questions need to be framed differently for young men and young women, youth from urban and rural communities, and/or youth from different socio-economic groups.

 

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Economic Prospects for Global Youth

ORGANIZER: 
CGAP & Citi Foundation
DATE: 
May 2, 2017 (12:00pm to 01:00pm)
Young people currently make up the largest youth population in history, and throughout the world they face a common challenge: persistent youth unemployment. Citi Foundation, a CGAP member, is investing $100 million globally over the next three years as part of its Pathways to Progress program to prepare 500,000 young people ages 16-24 for today's competitive job market.
 

Do Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills Explain the Gender Wage Gap in Middle-Income Countries? An Analysis Using STEP Data

World Bank

Gender-based wage discrimination is a highly researched area of labor economics. However, most studies on this topic have focused on schooling and paid limited attention to the mechanisms through which cognitive and noncognitive skills influence wages.

Skills for a Changing World: National Perspectives and the Global Movement

Brookings Institute

The Skills for a Changing World project presents evidence of a movement of education systems globally toward a more explicit focus on a broad range of skills that our 21st century society needs and demands. This movement can be seen in the vision and mission statements of education systems as well as through their curricula. Although clearly endorsed at the policy level, implementation is just beginning in some countries.

Developmental Evaluation in Practice: Lessons from Evaluating a Market-Based Employment Initiative

The Rockefeller Foundation

The process of implementing developmental evaluation for The Rockefeller Foundation’s youthdigital employment initiative yielded some valuable lessons which could be of benefit to the evaluation community, particularly evaluation practitioners and managers. This paper presents those lessons, including the challenges the evaluation team faced, the solutions it brokered, and the insights to be applied in the future.

Prospects Practice Paper- Experiential Learning: Fostering Lasting Behavioral Change

Mercy Corps

The term ‘experiential learning’ is often mistakenly used to describe any learning experience that involves participatory activities. This paper presents an overview of what true experiential learning is and how this form of learning allows for real-world application - thus promoting lasting behavioural change. Furthermore, it explains how experiential learning was adopted as the methodological core of the Prospects psychosocial programme in Liberia, which builds ‘pre-employment skills’ in 3,500 vulnerable youth aged 15-24 years.

Breaking the Double Barrier of Poverty

Stanford Social Innovation Review
Instead of prescribing higher education as the silver-bullet solution to poverty, we must provide diverse and contextualized pathways to disadvantaged children, enabling them to redefine the dominant narrative of success.
 

Youth Economic Opportunities Network 2016 Report

Making Cents International
Making Cents International is committed to meeting the needs of the global youth population by developing and supporting evidence-based, scalable, and sustainable initiatives. For ten years, our Youth Economic Opportunities Network (YEO Network) has contributed to the capacity of youth development stakeholders to design, implement, and evaluate high-impact youth economic opportunity programs, policies, and partnerships.
 
Resource Type: 
Report

Adolescent Girls Empowerment Program (AGEP): Mid-Term Findings

Population Council

Social isolation, economic vulnerability, and lack of access to health care and education prevent healthy transitions from childhood to adulthood, especially for vulnerable adolescent girls in developing countries. In Zambia, poor girls often are at high risk of gender-based violence, unintended pregnancy, and HIV. Many drop out of school, are unable to find employment, lack the ability to make independent decisions, and are not being reached by existing programs for young people.

WEBINAR: Engaging Youth in Research

ORGANIZER: 
YouthPower Learning & American Evaluation Association (AEA)
DATE: 
Mar 15, 2017 (11:00am to 12:00pm)

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