FULL LIST OF LIVELIHOODS

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

Making Cents International

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

Rapid Market Assessment of Key Sectors for Women and Youth in Zimbabwe

International Labour Organization

This Rapid Market Assessment (RMA) was conducted at the request of the ILO to support the design and development of a 3-year project funded by the African Development Bank (AfDB) and scheduled to run from 2017-2019 in Zimbabwe. The project aims to support women and youth in rural livelihoods to generate better and more sustainable income and employment opportunities by strengthening production and value-addition in a number of key rural economic sectors.

Market Labor and Youth Capacity Assessment

Global Communities Partners for Good

Worldwide, young people are three times more likely than their parents to be out of work. There are two related issues: high levels of youth unemployment and a shortage of people with critical job skills. Lebanon is experiencing these same issues, in its own particular economic context.

Private Sector Partnership and Out-of-School Youth Development: The MYDev Experience

EDC and USAID

Emerging economies within fragile environments hinge upon youth having the right kinds of technical and work readiness skills to secure meaningful, well-paid work and in turn contribute to family livelihoods. Throughout the world, EDC’s youth programs have helped young people succeed in jobs, entrepreneurship, and on-going career learning through programs that connect young people with skills training and employers.

Scaling Demand-Driven Training Programs: A Framework

Making Cents International

“Building Inclusive Economies, where more people have access to more opportunities, equal shots at success, and the freedom to dene what success looks like for themselves” is a pillar of the Rockefeller Foundation's work. By 2050, 400 million young people in Africa will need sustainable employment opportunities, while national labor markets are struggling to keep up with this youth bulge.

Invisible Lives: Understanding Youth Livelihoods In Ghana and Uganda

MasterCard Foundation

African youth lead varied and complex lives. They face diverse situations and opportunities. The recurring theme is one of challenge. On one hand, Africa is experiencing unprecedented population growth, with limited formal sector employment prospects. Despite new economic opportunities, formal jobs and wage employment remain elusive. On the other hand, investments in primary education have created better access to education and have contributed to a new era of prosperity and opportunity across Africa, yet opportunities for youth are uneven across the continent.

Can Arts-Based Interventions Enhance Labor Market Outcomes among Youth? Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Rio de Janeiro

RUHR Economic Papers

This paper provides findings of a small-scale, innovative labor training program that uses expressive arts and theatre as a pedagogical tool. The corresponding life skills training component is combined with a technical component teaching vocational skills. To our knowledge, this is the first paper to rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of a training program constructed around expressive arts.

Resource Type: 
Paper

PROJECT: Nicaragua Technical Vocational Education and Training Strengthening for At-Risk Youth

Creative Associates International
Brief Background
 
Nicaraguan youth complete an average of six years of schooling. Along the Caribbean coast, youth average less than three years of schooling. This not only results in a youth population with low levels of productivity and high unemployment rates, but also constrains economic development.
 

Pages