FULL LIST OF FINANCIAL LITERACY/EDUCATION

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

Financial Inclusion for Children and Youth

Child & Youth Finance International (CYFI)
This paper is part of the Child and Youth Finance International Landscape Series. Each paper in the Landscape Series looks back on the developments of recent years and looks forward to the future. This paper focuses on financial inclusion for children and youth. 

Webinar Recording: Rural Youth Finance - A Bridge too Far?

Making Cents International and RTI International

Rural youth tend to be the least financially included: youth financial inexperience and limited assets exacerbate the basic rural finance challenges of low population density and poor infrastructure.  Nonetheless, they demand financial services to manage their resources, build assets, and invest in livelihoods or education. How should the financial sector react to this situation – try to serve rural youth directly with new products and services, focus on the “near adults” in a rural finance strategy and deepen services over time, or ignore this population until the challenges of rural finance can be overcome? 136 financial inclusion practitioners came together on January 11th to discuss these issues and determine whether rural youth financial inclusion was possible, or simply a bridge too far.

Resource Type: 
E-Resource

WEBINAR: Rural Youth Financial Inclusion – A Bridge too Far? Jan 11, 2017

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International and RTI International
DATE: 
Jan 11, 2017 (09:00am to 10:00am)

Making Cents and RTI International are pleased to announce an in-person and webinar event on January 11, 2017 that will bring together financial inclusion and youth experts to discuss the key issues related to scaling rural and youth-inclusive financial services.  The panel will highlight digital and practical innovations that have the potential to financially include rural populations and especially youth, but also the challenges of applying them to this hard-to-reach group. Panelists will draw from discussions at the recent USAID-sponsored Financial Inclusion Forum, results from a 6-part rural youth learning series developed by Making Cents and IFAD, promising practices from USAID’s K-YES project in Kenya, and other initiatives focusing on rural youth financial service provision.  

BLOG: Does the Path to Serving Rural Youth Lead to Adults First? Dec 2016

Making Cents International

The challenge of youth unemployment continues to garner headlines. Recently, the New York Times described the demographic challenge as, “The World Has a Problem: Too Many Young People.”[1] These headlines have galvanized interest in youth and led governments and donors to re-focus their efforts on employing this growing population. Youth-inclusive financial efforts have expanded as well, aimed at providing youth with the credit and savings services necessary to facilitate their “earning and learning.”

GUIDE: Youth Guide to the Global Goals, Dec 2016

Youth Service America

The SDGs build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and aim to go further to end all forms of poverty. The new Goals are unique in that they call for action by all countries - regardless of income - to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and addresses a range of social needs including education, health, social protection, and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and environmental protection.

BLOG: Access To Finance For Youth: An Opportunity In Afghanistan, Oct 2016

Chemonics International

Financial inclusion seeks to increase the number of individuals who are able to access formal financial services, with a focus on providing access to marginalized populations such as youth or women. According to the World Bank, almost 40 percent of the adults in the world do not use formal financial services, such as licensed commercial and development banks, savings and loan companies, and deposit-taking entities. The majority of the individuals who do not access these services come from poor households. 

The Annual Conference on Financial Education - March 29-31, 2017

ORGANIZER: 
The Institute of Financial Literacy
DATE: 
Mar 29, 2017 (All day) to Mar 31, 2017 (All day)

The Annual Conference on Financial Education promotes the effective delivery of consumer financial products, services and education by hosting a national event for professionals providing these services. The Conference is a showcase for financial education success stories, offering attendees proven strategies, tips and techniques to achieve intended outcomes, funding goals and program sustainability. Each year the conference is attended by 200 professionals representing credit unions, banks, K-12 education, higher education, social services, debt management, government, military and other industries.

PRESENTATION: Rapid-Prototyping Challenge: Race to Create Youth Mobile Products, Sep 2016

Praekelt Foundation, Save the Children

Join your peers in a race to develop a prototype for a new mobile application to advance financial capability in this practical, results-driven workshop. Using personas and user journeys created by and with youth, each group will be supplied with a toolkit and guided by a Human Centered Design expert to develop a mobile financial inclusion prototype during the session. Through this process, participants will be introduced to the tools they need to use rapid prototyping techniques in their own work and become familiar with some of the most promising approaches for financial inclusion.

Resource Type: 
Presentation

BLOG: Rethinking the ‘Youth Are Not Interested in Agriculture’ Narrative, Oct 2016

Next Billion

In 2013, I interviewed a group of young people, staff and volunteers at a youth empowerment center in Kenya about their perceptions of agriculture as a livelihood. The interviews were part of a study driven by concerns about Kenya’s youth bulge, coupled with anecdotal evidence that the country’s youth had negative attitudes about working in the agricultural sector. The attitudes of the youth I interviewed were shaped primarily by the significant barriers they faced in accessing the capital needed to develop agriculture-based enterprises. Indeed, my findings pointed to the conclusion that the youth and agriculture problem runs deeper than the “youth are not interested” narrative.

Pages