FULL LIST OF GENDER

This cross-cutting theme addresses the role that gender plays in shaping economic opportunities, especially for adolescent girls and young women. Understanding the importance of gender in youth economic opportunities programming helps stakeholders identify constraints and opportunities that can increase effective participation levels of both sexes, or determine when sex-specific programs are most appropriate.

Where are we now?

With a population of nearly 7 billion people, adolescent girls, young women, and older women—in their multiple roles as workers, caregivers, and mothers—are critical to sustainable economic development. Talent is one of the most important determinants of competitiveness. Countries that can garner innovation and creativity, and leverage the economic participation of its entire population are more likely to succeed in today’s challenging global landscape. For example, the Nike Foundation found that if young Nigerian women had the same employment rates as young men, the country would add US $13.9 billion annually.1 Thus, the case for empowering girls and young women and leveraging their talent is compelling because it makes both economic and social sense.

Trends and Emerging Practices

  • Girls as young as ten are economic participants in their households and capable of saving.  By recognizing girls as economic participants, organizations can provide them with access to both financial literacy and savings offerings they require to mitigate risk later in life.
  • Investing in young women pays off for their families as well. Women invest 90% of their earnings back into their families compared to men who invest 30% or 40%.2
  • Girls who are less financially dependent are at less risk of HIV infection and negative effects of early pregnancy and child bearing.
  • Adolescent girls and young women must be differentiated. Girls face unique challenges and are at distinct developmental and life stages that need tailored programming. There are very few studies or statistics that paint an accurate picture of the lives of girls and the impacts of programs on them and their communities.
  • Disaggregation of data by both age and gender shows evidence for more effective program investments. Studies by groups, such as the Population Council, indicate that many organizations inadvertently favor older and male youth participants in their programs, many of whom have already benefitted from support. Married and less visible young women, on the other hand, are often unable to access programs. 
  • Any program designed to benefit young women should take into consideration what needs to happen with community stakeholders, the role of men and boys in that community, and what kinds of strategies will ensure girls benefit from the program and gain support of the community to thrive in ways that may challenge cultural and societal norms.
  • For very vulnerable young women – diversifying income sources, developing self-confidence, and acquiring assets in the form of savings are likely better indicators of improvement than income itself.

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

More Than Lighting: Women Entrepreneurs Turn Solar Technology Into Opportunity

Next Billion

For the more than 1.2 billion people in the world living without electricity, lighting at night is a huge challenge. Many rural homes rely on kerosene lamps, which cast poor light, can be toxic to their users and, when knocked over, burn some 2.2 million children a year. Among the world’s poorest people, purchasing kerosene can consume up to a third of their total income.

Rapid Market Assessment of Key Sectors for Women and Youth in Zimbabwe

International Labour Organization

This Rapid Market Assessment (RMA) was conducted at the request of the ILO to support the design and development of a 3-year project funded by the African Development Bank (AfDB) and scheduled to run from 2017-2019 in Zimbabwe. The project aims to support women and youth in rural livelihoods to generate better and more sustainable income and employment opportunities by strengthening production and value-addition in a number of key rural economic sectors.

Unilever Young Entrepreneurs Awards

Unilever

We are living in a world where temperatures are rising, water shortages are more frequent, food supplies are increasingly scarce and the gap between rich and poor is increasing. Populations are growing fast, making basic hygiene and sanitation even more of a challenge.

Bridging the STEM and ICT gender gap in Tanzania

Internatinoal Telecommunication Union (ITU)

Tanzania is currently facing an undeniable challenge: there are few girls in the information and communication technology (ICT) field, and those who want to join the field often opt instead for roles that commonly have limited vacancies, like doctor’s positions. This leads to a scarcity of female role models who have thrived in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) and ICT.

Women in the Wind: Analysis of Migration, Youth Economic Empowerment and Gender in Vietnam and in the Philippines

Plan International

While internal youth migration is thought to be an increasingly prevalent phenomenon in a number of Southeast Asian countries, very few research studies have examined this topic in depth. In particular, little is known about the experiences of young women who migrate internally, and the gender-specific aspects of youth migration. In response to these gaps in evidence, Plan International contracted Coram International in 2016 to conduct a research on the gender, youth economic empowerment, and internal economic migration experiences in Vietnam and the Philippines.

Do Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills Explain the Gender Wage Gap in Middle-Income Countries? An Analysis Using STEP Data

World Bank

Gender-based wage discrimination is a highly researched area of labor economics. However, most studies on this topic have focused on schooling and paid limited attention to the mechanisms through which cognitive and noncognitive skills influence wages.

Empowering Women and Girls: A Policy Event Series for 2017

ORGANIZER: 
Plan International and Wilson Center
DATE: 
Apr 25, 2017 (01:30pm to 02:45pm)

Empowering Women and Girls:
A Policy Event Series for 2017

by Plan International USA and the Woodrow Wilson Center

RSVP

April 25th, 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM: Women’s Leadership for Stability and Security

Women’s Economic Empowerment Global Learning Forum

ORGANIZER: 
SEEP Network
DATE: 
May 23, 2017 (All day) to May 25, 2017 (All day)
The advancement of women’s rights and economic empowerment in market systems contributes to the economic well-being of families, communities, and nations. Increasingly, stakeholders from the public and private sectors as well as civil society members are raising their voices on women’s economic empowerment.
 

Youth Economic Opportunities Network 2016 Report

Making Cents International
Making Cents International is committed to meeting the needs of the global youth population by developing and supporting evidence-based, scalable, and sustainable initiatives. For ten years, our Youth Economic Opportunities Network (YEO Network) has contributed to the capacity of youth development stakeholders to design, implement, and evaluate high-impact youth economic opportunity programs, policies, and partnerships.
 
Resource Type: 
Report

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