FULL LIST OF SOFT SKILLS

Recent research shows that soft skills can have a greater impact on an individual’s employment, earnings, and overall well-being than job-specific technical skills. In fact, employers globally report difficulty filling jobs because new recruits often lack soft skills. According to Child Trends, soft skills include “competencies, behaviors, attitudes and personal qualities that enable people to effectively navigate their environment, work well with others, perform well, and achieve their goals.” Researchers, educators and youth development practitioners use varying frameworks to classify the ‘most important’ soft skills. This is demonstrated by the multitude of names often considered synonymous with soft skills, including: non-cognitive, workforce readiness, life, behavioral, and 21st century skills (among others). Examples of the most valuable types of soft skills to youth and adult success are: social skills, communication skills, problem solving, critical thinking, self-control, and positive self-concept.

 

Measuring Global Citizenship Education- A Collection of Practices and Tools

Brookings Institute & Youth Advocacy Group (YAG)

The idea of global citizenship has existed for several millennia. In ancient Greece, Diogenes declared himself a citizen of the world, while the Mahaupanishads of ancient India spoke of the world as one family. Today, education for global citizenship is recognized in many countries as a strategy for helping children and youth prosper in their personal and professional lives and contribute to building a better world.

Resource Type: 
Toolkit

Do Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills Explain the Gender Wage Gap in Middle-Income Countries? An Analysis Using STEP Data

World Bank

Gender-based wage discrimination is a highly researched area of labor economics. However, most studies on this topic have focused on schooling and paid limited attention to the mechanisms through which cognitive and noncognitive skills influence wages.

Skills for a Changing World: National Perspectives and the Global Movement

Brookings Institute

The Skills for a Changing World project presents evidence of a movement of education systems globally toward a more explicit focus on a broad range of skills that our 21st century society needs and demands. This movement can be seen in the vision and mission statements of education systems as well as through their curricula. Although clearly endorsed at the policy level, implementation is just beginning in some countries.

Prospects Practice Paper- Experiential Learning: Fostering Lasting Behavioral Change

Mercy Corps

The term ‘experiential learning’ is often mistakenly used to describe any learning experience that involves participatory activities. This paper presents an overview of what true experiential learning is and how this form of learning allows for real-world application - thus promoting lasting behavioural change. Furthermore, it explains how experiential learning was adopted as the methodological core of the Prospects psychosocial programme in Liberia, which builds ‘pre-employment skills’ in 3,500 vulnerable youth aged 15-24 years.

On the Road to Career Goals through Soft Skills Training in Afghanistan

FHI 360

Beheshta, a university student in Afghanistan, has an ambitious long-term goal: She wants to join the civil service and become either a minister or member of parliament. As an Afghan woman, achieving this goal will require her to overcome significant challenges, including the expectation that women marry and have children rather than pursue a career, as well as the realities of entering a workforce that is overwhelmingly male (only 15.8 percent of the workforce is women). Beheshta will also face pressures against participating in the wider community outside of her home.

Annual Research and Policy Symposium: Skills for a Changing World

ORGANIZER: 
Brookings Institute
DATE: 
Apr 5, 2017 (09:00am to 05:00pm)
Education systems across the world are undertaking transformations in order to develop essential skills and competencies in students to be successful in the 21st century. This global movement is reacting to and preparing for changing social, technological, and economic demands. In order to be effective, the full breadth of skills, from literacy and numeracy to creativity, collaboration, and problem solving, must be cultivated across age groups and learning environments, including school, community, home, and society at large.
 

Breaking the Double Barrier of Poverty

Stanford Social Innovation Review
Instead of prescribing higher education as the silver-bullet solution to poverty, we must provide diverse and contextualized pathways to disadvantaged children, enabling them to redefine the dominant narrative of success.
 

Youth Economic Opportunities Network 2016 Report

Making Cents International
Making Cents International is committed to meeting the needs of the global youth population by developing and supporting evidence-based, scalable, and sustainable initiatives. For ten years, our Youth Economic Opportunities Network (YEO Network) has contributed to the capacity of youth development stakeholders to design, implement, and evaluate high-impact youth economic opportunity programs, policies, and partnerships.
 
Resource Type: 
Report

Augmented Learning and Teaching the Skills of the 21st Century

Center for Work Ethic Development, Georgetown

As the economy becomes increasingly automated, employment skills for both blue and white collar jobs must evolve to keep up. So-called “21st-century skills” learning rotates away from hard STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and incorporates soft skills to augment the progression of technology.

Early Childhood Engagement for Lifelong Learning

Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL)

From conception to five years of age, early childhood is an extremely important period for cognitive and psychosocial development. Children’s high levels of brain plasticity and neurogenesis make them especially receptive to external stimuli. Young children’s minds are still learning how to learn, and simple play activities that stimulate the brain through all the senses can help improve their ability to think, communicate, and connect with others. Research from around the world suggests that guaranteeing such early childhood stimulation is critical.

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