FULL LIST OF SOFT SKILLS

Recent research shows that soft skills can have a greater impact on an individual’s employment, earnings, and overall well-being than job-specific technical skills. In fact, employers globally report difficulty filling jobs because new recruits often lack soft skills. According to Child Trends, soft skills include “competencies, behaviors, attitudes and personal qualities that enable people to effectively navigate their environment, work well with others, perform well, and achieve their goals.” Researchers, educators and youth development practitioners use varying frameworks to classify the ‘most important’ soft skills. This is demonstrated by the multitude of names often considered synonymous with soft skills, including: non-cognitive, workforce readiness, life, behavioral, and 21st century skills (among others). Examples of the most valuable types of soft skills to youth and adult success are: social skills, communication skills, problem solving, critical thinking, self-control, and positive self-concept.

 

The Future of Jobs and Skills in the Middle East and North Africa

World Economic Forum

Education and work in the Middle East and North Africa region will determine the livelihoods of over 300 million people and drive growth and development for generations to come. As one of the youngest populations in the world, it is imperative that the region make adequate investments in education and learning that hold value in the labour market and prepare citizens for the world of tomorrow. In addition, as the global transformation of work unfolds in the region, policymakers, business leaders and workers must be prepared to proactively manage this period of transition.

Five Strategies to Help Youth Succeed in the Digital Age

World Bank

According to the World Bank Development Report on Digital Dividends (2016), the rapid spread of digital technologies around the world is boosting economic growth and expands opportunities in many instances; but the benefits of technological changes are not evenly distributed to workers globally. For high-skilled workers, technology in most cases complements their skills, increases their productivity, and often leads to higher wages.

2017 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit

ORGANIZER: 
Making Cents International
DATE: 
Sep 27, 2017 (All day) to Sep 29, 2017 (All day)

The Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit is a global convening that brings together 500+ leading stakeholders from 55 countries to connect, exchange, and collaborate. Now in its 11th year, the Summit is the largest convening of its kind in North America for the youth economic opportunities community.

Program: Applications open for Future Leaders Connect

British Council
CONNECT TO THE OPPORTUNITY TO DEVELOP SKILLS AND CREATE POSITIVE CHANGE THROUGH POLICY MAKING
 
At the British Council we are committed to developing future leaders. To prepare for the world ahead of us the next generation of leaders must be skilled, innovative and globally connected people, able to make and respond to change with effective policy making. 
 

Skills at Scale: Transferable Skills in Secondary and Vocational Education in Africa

MasterCard Foundation

Despite the recent economic slowdown, the majority of African countries continue to experience economic growth, rising trade and increasing inflows of foreign investment. Peace, political stability and good governance are also on the rise. Yet a closer examination offers a sobering reminder that growth alone does not guarantee equitable development.

Measuring Global Citizenship Education- A Collection of Practices and Tools

Brookings Institute & Youth Advocacy Group (YAG)

The idea of global citizenship has existed for several millennia. In ancient Greece, Diogenes declared himself a citizen of the world, while the Mahaupanishads of ancient India spoke of the world as one family. Today, education for global citizenship is recognized in many countries as a strategy for helping children and youth prosper in their personal and professional lives and contribute to building a better world.

Resource Type: 
Toolkit

Do Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills Explain the Gender Wage Gap in Middle-Income Countries? An Analysis Using STEP Data

World Bank

Gender-based wage discrimination is a highly researched area of labor economics. However, most studies on this topic have focused on schooling and paid limited attention to the mechanisms through which cognitive and noncognitive skills influence wages.

Skills for a Changing World: National Perspectives and the Global Movement

Brookings Institute

The Skills for a Changing World project presents evidence of a movement of education systems globally toward a more explicit focus on a broad range of skills that our 21st century society needs and demands. This movement can be seen in the vision and mission statements of education systems as well as through their curricula. Although clearly endorsed at the policy level, implementation is just beginning in some countries.

Prospects Practice Paper- Experiential Learning: Fostering Lasting Behavioral Change

Mercy Corps

The term ‘experiential learning’ is often mistakenly used to describe any learning experience that involves participatory activities. This paper presents an overview of what true experiential learning is and how this form of learning allows for real-world application - thus promoting lasting behavioural change. Furthermore, it explains how experiential learning was adopted as the methodological core of the Prospects psychosocial programme in Liberia, which builds ‘pre-employment skills’ in 3,500 vulnerable youth aged 15-24 years.

On the Road to Career Goals through Soft Skills Training in Afghanistan

FHI 360

Beheshta, a university student in Afghanistan, has an ambitious long-term goal: She wants to join the civil service and become either a minister or member of parliament. As an Afghan woman, achieving this goal will require her to overcome significant challenges, including the expectation that women marry and have children rather than pursue a career, as well as the realities of entering a workforce that is overwhelmingly male (only 15.8 percent of the workforce is women). Beheshta will also face pressures against participating in the wider community outside of her home.

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