FULL LIST OF ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

Enterprise development programs help entrepreneurs to start and run profitable businesses through training, technical assistance, and inclusive market development activities. While the dynamism and innovation that entrepreneurs bring to an economy are one reason to implement activities in this area, the inability of the formal sector to produce enough jobs for the growing youth population makes self-employment an important option for youth as well.

Where We Are Now?

Similar to the general enterprise and market development field, youth enterprise development has moved from a focus solely on the enterprise itself to a more holistic approach. While providing training or technical assistance to an entrepreneur is still important, practitioners are complementing these types of assistance with activities to strengthen an enterprise’s overall ecosystem. For example, projects now include initiatives to strengthen entrepreneurs’ networks, so that they can gain business or mentoring assistance as necessary, or focus on strengthening the overall value chain specific to youth enterprises.

Trends and Best Practices:

  • Not all entrepreneurs are created equal. Many youth start businesses out of necessity and are unlikely to grow their business beyond the micro-stage. A smaller subset are more entrepreneurial minded and given the right set of circumstances, have a greater chance to develop a successful small enterprise. Practitioners and donors are distinguishing between these types of individuals and providing different types of support to each.
  • Successful young entrepreneurs capitalize on their passion and market opportunities. Successful programs recognize this and help develop opportunities in areas that are naturally interesting to youth, or work to educate youth that more traditional activities, such as agriculture, can be both inspiring and remunerative.
  • Successful capacity building initiatives help entrepreneurs obtain the information they need and have the skills to manipulate it for business success.
  • Entrepreneurs require the skills to both run a profitable business and a financially stable household.
  • USAID and other donors have begun incorporating youth inclusion activities to value chain projects in a more robust way. By integrating a “youth lens” in value chain assessments, implementers are able to identify constraints and opportunities specific to youth and beyond those that apply to value chain actors more broadly.

 

ARTICLE: Recognising the economic contribution of women isn't feminism, it's fact

Making Cents International

Despite the role that girls and women play in driving economic growth being widely acknowledged, it seems in practice, development programmes haven’t kept pace.

BLOG: Cities as Drivers of Economic Opportunity for Youth

Making Cents International

According to the recently released United Nations report (“World Urbanization Prospects”), more than half of humanity now lives in cities. Today, 54% of the world’s population, 3.9 billion people, resides in urban areas, compared to only 30% back in 1950. The report predicts that cities will add an additional 2.5 billion people by 2050, with nearly 90% of this increase happening in Asia and Africa.

Five Steps to More Meaningful Youth Engagement

JBS International, Inc.

My name is Matthew French and I work for JBS International, Inc. This blog draws upon research conducted under contract with USAID’s office of Education (read the full youth engagement report here), as well as my own experiences working with young people.

INTERVIEW : Unleash the entrepreneur in every small farmer - new UN agency chief

Thompson Reuters Foundation
Gilbert Houngbo, who served as Prime Minister of Togo from 2008 to 2012, was appointed as president of IFAD  (International Fund for Agricultural Development). 
 
Training young farmers to turn agriculture into a business is key to eradicating poverty and curbing economic migration, the new president of the U.N. agricultural development agency said on Wednesday.
 

On My Journey to Agripreneurship

MasterCard Foundation
My name is Laetitia Victoria Mukungu and I am from Kenya. I am a third-year student at EARTH University in Costa Rica, where I study Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resource Management. My passion lies in rural women’s empowerment, food security and child education.
 

The Future of Work We Want: A Global Dialogue

ORGANIZER: 
International Labour Organization
DATE: 
Apr 6, 2017 (All day) to Apr 7, 2017 (All day)

Around the world, in economies at all stages of development, profound changes in the nature of work are underway.

Youths Spearheading New Models for Putting The SDGs into Practice

Citiscope
For hundreds of millions of children and young adults who wake each day to poverty, the future can look daunting. There are few avenues to escape life in slums, where dreams often are dampened by a reality of limited access to essentials — such as education and health care — that others take for granted.
 

FELLOWSHIP: Anzisha Prize for African Youth Entrepreneurs

African Leadership Academy & MasterCard Foundation
Coveted fellowship to be awarded to 15 promising youth entrepreneurs
 

Bringing Youth Together to Innovate Is Key to Development in Africa

United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

Central to the 28th African Union Summit that takes place in Ethiopia this week and to the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) 

FELLOWSHIP: Pond's Fellowship Program

Vital Voices Global Partnership

Vital Voices is very eager to receive applications from capable and visionary young women and millennials, working on all issue-areas from both the private and non-profit sectors. This program is especially targeting women ages 18-25 from India, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam.

What sets these young leaders apart is their vision for change and determination to challenge the status quo. Fresh thinking and leading with empathy, inclusion and collaboration will make the difference to reshape our world for the better.

ABOUT VITAL VOICES  

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