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How to Prepare Today’s Youth for Tomorrow’s Job Market

Chemonics
After setting the global development agenda in 2000 with the Millennium Development Goals, the United Nations highlighted the need to focus on enhancing economic growth through sustainable and meaningful work in its 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Today, the UN calls for the “promotion of inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment, and decent work for all,” and seeks to address the 470 million jobs that need to be created for youth entering the workforce from 2016 to 2030.

The Power Skills in An Age of Disruption

Pyxera
“Almost 43 percent of the global youth labor force is either unemployed or working, yet living in poverty,” according to Global Employment Trends for Youth 2015 by the International Labour Organization. In countries with mature economies, nearly one in five students don’t acquire a minimum level of basic skills needed to be gainfully employed.
 

On My Journey to Agripreneurship

MasterCard Foundation
My name is Laetitia Victoria Mukungu and I am from Kenya. I am a third-year student at EARTH University in Costa Rica, where I study Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resource Management. My passion lies in rural women’s empowerment, food security and child education.
 

Equipping Kazakhstan's Future Workforce

The World Bank

Do you remember how you felt when you graduated from high-school or college? Like me, you probably experienced some uncertainty and anxiety about what comes next, asking questions such as: “Will I get a job, and if so, where?

Examining Breadth of Learning Opportunities in 21st Century Education Systems

Brookings
What should children be able to learn at school? Are math, reading, and science enough for the 21st century? From the earliest learners to adolescents, students across age groups are missing out on critical learning opportunities. These opportunities are those that help us develop a range of skills, essential to tackle the challenges of our dynamic, rapidly growing world and transform us into our “better selves”—mindful, empathetic, critical-thinking, creative, and collaborative beings.
 

The Future of Work for Youth in Latin America

International Labour Organization
ILO (International Labour Organization) News talked to José Manuel Salazar, ILO Regional Director for Latin America and the Caribbean, about opportunities and challenges waiting for young people in the world of work in the region.
 
How do you see the future of work?
When we talk about the future of work , a determining factor is demography and this tells us that the young population (15 to 29 years) in Latin America and the Caribbean has declined since the late 1990s. This reduction has become more pronounced since 2010. 

Youths Spearheading New Models for Putting The SDGs into Practice

Citiscope
For hundreds of millions of children and young adults who wake each day to poverty, the future can look daunting. There are few avenues to escape life in slums, where dreams often are dampened by a reality of limited access to essentials — such as education and health care — that others take for granted.
 

Finding a Formula for Youth Economic Empowerment

Plan International
Plan International’s Banking on Change program shows how providing girls and young women with savings skills doesn't just produce financial rewards.
 
“We were just using the money anywhere,” says Cleopatra, a 20 year-old young woman from the Central Province of Zambia, describing the challenge she once faced managing her family’s finances.
 

BLOG: Where are they now? The importance of alumni tracking in workforce training

RTI International
In a riff off of the old PSA that asked parents, “Its 10:00 pm, do you know where your children are?” –– we might ask educators, “It’s been a year, do you know where your alumni are?”
 

PROJECT: Nicaragua Technical Vocational Education and Training Strengthening for At-Risk Youth

Creative Associates International
Brief Background
 
Nicaraguan youth complete an average of six years of schooling. Along the Caribbean coast, youth average less than three years of schooling. This not only results in a youth population with low levels of productivity and high unemployment rates, but also constrains economic development.
 

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